My Pioneering Family

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http://youtu.be/nDd2USzIEkA

I ran across this wonderful YouTube video about life as a pioneer, and it added further  to the respect I have for the courage of my forefathers in settling the land.  In the latest book I’m writing, “The Dobyns Chronicles,” I follow one branch of my family starting in Virginia.  They migrate from Virginia in the 1700′s settling in Ohio and Indiana.  My Great-Great Grandfather then migrated with his family to Texas, living in the Sherman/Denison area on the Red River.

Everyone has stories of their family.  Have you ever stopped and thought about how they managed to accomplish what they did.  It is mind-boggling when you consider the obstacles they had to overcome in order to settle a new land.  The hardships they must have endured day after day. The things we take for granted today.

I was very fortunate having a mother who loved family history, and wanted to talk about it.  I grew up listening to the stories about how life was lived when her Grandfather was a boy, and living through the depression.  She taught my sister and I how to survive.  I have her Grandmother’s lye soap recipe.  I truly hope it never gets to a point I have to make my own soap, but I know how, if I need it.  I can live without electricity and running water if I have to.  I know how to plant a garden and preserve food.    This is where I am very grateful for the life today.  I don’t have to do what was common place to the pioneering families of yesteryear.

How many people today could make it across the miles and miles of plains, not seeing a soul, or cross a mountain range?  I know I couldn’t do it.  I use to live in Wyoming many years ago, and looked at the wagon ruts cutting across the country.  The canyons, wagons would have to be lowered into with ropes and then lifted up the other side.  The small cemeteries, containing loved one’s that could go no further.  Between Rawlins and Casper, there is a large granite rock.  The pioneers who traveled by this rock would chisel their name and the year into the rock.  They wanted it known, they were there.

4 responses »

    • Hello, I hope you are having a good day. I helped my mom make it many years ago. She would put it in the washer with my dad’s really dirty farming clothes. I thought it looked a lot like peanut butter. We put it in a large wash pan and then formed little round balls while it was warm. She would then drop a couple of them in the washer (wringer type). It cleaned his clothes very well. I haven’t made any since.

  1. Pingback: Pioneers « Days Gone By

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