A simile and Metaphore

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300 Social sciences

Image by Helder da Rocha via Flickr

We use them all the time, but the majority of the time we do not put names to them.  They seem to come automatically when we are writing.  A simile is defined as a figure of speeh where two unlike things are compared.  Usually started with words like, or as. Exp.: She’s unraveling like a ball of yarn

A metaphor is something  spoken  or written which shows how the object or person resembles something else.  “She is such a party pooper.”  “It’s raining cats and dogs.”

To help with a simpler understanding since they are so close: A metaphor is an eququation, where a simile is an approximation.  If it makes good sense it is probably a metaphor.

In writing we are suppose to use non-common semiles and metaphores.  We want our descriptions to be vivid and pull out the readers imagination.  Discriptions have the power to open up the world of your book or close the cover.

“”Metaphores feel more powerful, but similes are a far suppler instrument.  You can do anything with them–stick them in dialogue, give them to a first person narrator, embed them in news headlines or gossip.  Metaphors lend themselves to a heavier narritive style which may or may not work for your story, depending on its tone. (Writing Fiction by Gotham Writers Workshop)”

Today’s video is similes and Metaphores in Pop Culture, Enjoy

http://youtu.be/EQL-wEe03hc

One response »

  1. Pingback: Metaphor | On The Web

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