Monthly Archives: August 2012

Sally’s Warnings Chapter 4

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Background
Sally has the exhusband of her once best friend show up on her door step. She doesn’t know how to deal with him so she does what ever she can to get rid of him. She is also having to deal with an alco

 

Is this night ever going to end? Sally’s tossing and turning through the night causes her to wake frequently. When her eyes pop open, she hears Bill’s voice saying, “I love you.” She finds herself wide-awake when her parents get up to get ready to go to work.

“Mornin’, Mom. I’m going to get me a cup of coffee. Do you want me to get you one?”

“Sure, it can cool a little while I’m getting dressed. Why are you up? I usually have to drag you out of bed before we leave the house.”

“I can’t get into it right now, but I’ll tell you later. I have a lot on my mind right now and it messes with my sleep.”

“Is it something I can help you with, baby?”

“No Mom, this is something I have to work out for myself.”

“Okay, when you’re ready to talk let me know.”

“Sure, Mom, I will. I left your coffee on the kitchen counter by the pot.”

Sally takes her coffee back to her room. Sitting on the bottom bunk, she sips her coffee and thinks about telling Linda about Bill. I’m not going to tell her anything until I decide what I’m going to do. Maybe the show this afternoon will take my mind off my problem.

***

Sally pulls in front of Linda’s house and honks. Her younger brothers come running out of the house, yelling back at Linda. “Sally’s here”. They are like bugs on the car, all over it and asking what seems like a thousand questions. Linda gets in the car, but has to get out, getting her brothers off the car so they can leave.

“I bet they are a handful for your mother,” Sally says laughing. She backs the car out of the driveway and heads for McAlester.

“You have no idea what it’s like living with them two. They are constantly into something or trying to be mean to me. They don’t bother Carol, because they know she will whip them.”

“I thought your sister left for East Central. Haven’t they started school?”

“No, they haven’t. She is leaving this weekend to get her dorm room set up. Since it’s her second year she’ll be staying at a different dorm than she did last year.”

“Changing the subject, Mom told me she’ll get daddy to fix the floor board of this car. I’m so tired of losing shoes out those blasted holes. I lost one last week when we went to the river. Mama told me to stop pulling them off and I wouldn’t lose them.”

“She’s right, cause you never leave your shoes on your feet,” Linda says.

“I don’t like wearing shoes. I want to go barefooted. It drives mama crazy. She is one who puts her shoes on first thing in the morning and they don’t come off till bedtime.”

The girls get to town without any problems. Sally parks in front of the Okla Theater and they buy their tickets for Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte. They go into the theater and stand for a minute at the door to let their eyes adjust to the darkness. When they feel they can walk in safety, they walk the center aisle until they find two empty seats together.

“Excuse me, excuse me”, both girls say as they step in front of two young fellows to get to their seats. The movie was beginning as the girls settle into their seats with their popcorn and cokes to drink. Occasionally they glance at the two boys sitting beside Sally. “They’re good-looking,” Linda whispers to Sally.

In one scene, Bette Davis screams and jumps at someone with a hatchet. It startles Sally, who then screams and grabs the young man sitting next to her. When she realizes what she’s done, she’s embarrassed. “I am so sorry I grabbed you. The movie scared me and I didn’t realize what I was doing until it was too late.”

The young man laughs, “it’s all right, I grabbed my brother’s arm. We weren’t expecting it, that’s all.” The four of them finish watching the move, get up and walk to the lobby. The young man looks at Sally and smiles. “My name is Mike Hentry and this is my brother Dougin. Would the two of you like to go for a float at the A&W?”

“How about we follow you there? That way you won’t have to bring us back to my car,” Sally says.

“Sure, if that is what you want to do.”

“Mike, my car is right in front of the theater. Where are you parked?”

“We’re in the parking lot at the end of the street. Give us a couple of minutes to get to the car and then head to the drive-in. What are you driving?”

“I’m in a black ‘54 Ford. It will be easy to spot. I think I’ve got the oldest car in the area.” They all laugh, and the boys head for their car. As soon as the boys get out the door, the girls start talking.

“Can you believe this,” Linda said. “Both of them are as cute as bugs’ ears, but I like Dougan.”

“That’s quite all right because I like Mike. I like his blonde hair and blue eyes.” Sally digs the keys out of her purse and they walk to the car.

“Oh, it’s awful out here,” Linda whines. “We should have come to a night show.”

“Yeah, it kind of sucks the air out of your lungs. Once we start moving it’ll get a little better.” Sally pulls into the slot at the A&W the same time Mike and Dougin pull in.

Mike leans out his window and says, “Come on over here and get in.”

Sally and Linda get out of the Ford and walk to Mike’s car. It’s a red ’62 two-door Chevy. Dougin gets out of the front seat and holds the seat back for Linda to get into the car. Dougin then crawls in beside her. Sally gets into the front seat next to Mike. Sally starts the conversation between her and Mike. “Do you live here in town?

“We have an efficiency apartment at Willow Valley Motel. We’re doing a job for Cherokee Telephone Company.”

“Really, that’s our telephone company.”

“You know all of that underground cable that’s going in.”

“Yeah, I’ve seen it.”

“That’s what we’re doing, laying that cable. Let’s get our drinks ordered. What do you want, Sally?”

”I’d like a root beer float.” Sally replies.

“Dougin, what are you and Linda going to have?” Mike asks.

“We’re both having a Coke float.”Dougin tells his brother.

They all have their floats and continue talking about each other’s lives. The time arrives for Sally and Linda to leave. “Thank you, Mike, for the floats. We had a nice time. Maybe we’ll see you when you place the wire in our area,” Sally says.

“Yeah, maybe, but I have a better idea. Why don’t you and Linda have dinner with us next Saturday night and then we’ll go to the drive-in theater?”

Linda leans on the front seat, “I think that’s a great idea. I’m all for it. What about you, Sally?”

“Sounds like fun. Do you want us to meet you in town or are you going to pick us up?”

***

As Sally and Linda sit with their newfound friends, they do not notice the car following them. Bill can’t believe what his eyes are showing him. Sally gets out of her car, goes, and gets in the car with this blonde dude. Who is he? Sally is going to marry me and no one else. Go ahead, little girl and have your fun, but you’re not getting rid of me, ever.

 

I Found It

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Today, I’m going back to story telling. This is a short story from my book Shirley’s Shorts and Flashes. I’ve decided to ebook publish on Amazon. I may put it in book form at a later time, just because I like to hold books. There is something about the smell of a book that you can’t get from a Kindle.  I hope you enjoy this nonfiction story.  Have a blessed day.

 

I Found It

 

The day I found it, I knew beyond any doubt, He was real. That profound piece of knowledge was shown to me repeatedly through my life.

I am a mother of two children, now grown. I’ve been an RN for thirty-two years. Before I became a nurse, I spent years trying to survive and take care of my two young children as a single mom. I lived on food stamps and in public housing, and I hated every minute of it.

I’d always wanted to be a nurse and in fact started college right out of high school. I decided at that point I wanted my man, and put love above my education. I was married to my children’s father for nine years. He decided he wanted to play. I’m a selfish woman, I don’t share well. My marriage ended.

I lived in Vernon, Texas when my marriage ended. My parents lived in Oklahoma. Everything about my world crumbled around me. I didn’t have a job, I had two small children, and I was an emotional wreck. I wasn’t dealing with my failed marriage well. I had my children wanting their father, and my family telling me the children needed their daddy. I actually swallowed my pride and asked my husband to move back home. I met him at the door, when he moved back. He gave me a kiss and I knew with that kiss something was missing. His being home lasted four days. He couldn’t stay away from his play toy. There was too much pain to handle. I packed up and moved back home to McAlester.

The subsidized housing we lived in was not bad, but the neighborhood could get rough. At that point, in time, which was in the mid 1970’s I, felt as if I were the only caucasian in the complex. My apartment was broken into a couple of times and once I made the mistake of leaving my month’s food stamps on the end table. They disappeared.

I rejoiced when I received a five-dollar increase in my welfare check. Every five dollars in my pocket helped. The rejoicing didn’t last long. The housing authority raised my rent by six dollars a month. It was a losing battle. There was no way to win.

We never had enough money to buy the non-food items we needed, such as laundry soap, toilet paper, and dishwashing soap. Times got so bad, my children would go to a service station and steal toilet paper for us to use.

Towards the end of the month, we would run out of food. Weekends and summer were the hardest, because the kids didn’t get their breakfast and lunch at school. I was blessed enough to have a mom and dad who let me and the kids come to their house for supper when we needed to. I felt like a failure from beginning to end. I couldn’t do anything right. I was supposed to have stayed married, and raised my kids with both a mother and a father. Instead, I felt like a moocher, even though I know they didn’t feel that way. The guilt I felt was eating me up.

I finally got enough of my mind back that I decided to go back to college and fulfill my dream of becoming a nurse. I couldn’t continue to let my children live the way they were living. My mom was so supportive. She encouraged me every chance she got. She wanted me to get the education she’d always wanted for me. I had to be able to take care of my children and myself.

My uncle teased me about not needing an education, because I now had two diplomas, Allan and Stephanie. He’d tried to talk me out of quitting school to marry my kids father, but of course being young and in love I didn’t listen.

Using Pell Grants, I moved to Wilburton and began college at Eastern Oklahoma State College. I made application to their nursing program and was accepted. The two-year program, which I took three to complete, was tough. I took all of my prerequisites one year and did nursing the next two years.

The kids and I lived in a two-bedroom house trailer on campus for the first year. I had a car but didn’t drive much except to go back home to see mom and dad. Mom would usually give me money for the gasoline. The problem of living in Wilburton and being in school, I no longer qualified for food stamps, because I received too much money from the Pell Grant.

We still had to eat and pay bills, so I took a part time job at a local nursing home working as an aide. Since my family owned nursing homes, I was well qualified. I’d done everything from cooking in the kitchen to the laundry room. The down side to the job, it didn’t pay much more than minimum wage, and I had to pay for day care. It didn’t leave me much money. I worked whenever I could.

Through God’s grace, we made it through the first year. Due to almost freezing to death in that trailer, I found a walk-up apartment I could afford to rent. The kids’ day care was down the road from us about a block, and I could drop them off on my way to class without having to drive out of my way.

My second year of nursing school was the toughest. I couldn’t work many hours because of my clinical schedule for school. It got to the point one time when there wasn’t even milk for the kids in the refrigerator. I had nothing. I cried and I prayed and cried some more. I’d finally cried all the tears I could and I needed comfort.

Something made me pick up my Bible and I began reading in my favorite book of Isaiah. I felt comforted, as I always did. After my divorce, I slept with the Bible close to me. God was my comfort and my strength. When I turned, the page, what I saw astounded me. I began crying all over again, except this time with joy.

Stuck inside my Bible was a crisp, new ten-dollar bill. I didn’t put it there, which made it a miracle for me. It would let me buy food until my payday from work rolled around in a couple of days. I fell on my knees and began praising God. I knew then I didn’t have anything to worry about because He was with me. You know what, He still is. I worry very little because I know God has my back. I have failed him many times, but He has never failed me.

Times remained hard while I was in school, but I received my nursing license and my world turned around. I know I made it through with God’s help and the help of my family.

 

 

Dying to Be Me

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Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Hong...

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Hong Kong (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hi everyone today I’m going to discuss the book by Anita Moorjani, called Dying to Be Me. I read this book over the past couple of days. I am a big fan of Dr. Wayne Dyer. In case you don’t know who he is, as far as I’m concerned he’s the guru of self-help. He recommended this book so I bought it the first opportunity I had.

Anita Moorjani is a young Eastern Indian who lived through an amazing event. She and her husband live in Hong Kong. She was diagnosed with stage 4 lymphatic cancer.  Anita did not use any western medicine, only alternative types. She became ill enough after four years she died in the hospital. She had the choice if she wanted to come back to her body and she chose to, after speaking with her father and best friend who had passed before her. It is absolutely amazing to read. I was eating it up like candy.

I enjoyed the book, up to the point I read a question and answer session which she placed at the end of the chapters. Anita says we are pure love and you feel nothing but unconditional love when your on the other side. A question asks “Are you saying that a criminal–say, a murderer–would go to the same place and feel the same nonjudgement as a saint?” Her answer absolutely stunned me and I immediately turned off inside. Here is her answer, as written. “Yes, that’s what I’m saying. In that state, we understand that everything we’ve done, no matter how seemingly negative, has actually come from fear, pain, and limited perspectives.  A lot of what we do or feel is because we know no other way. Once we’re in the other realm, however, our physical limitations become clear to us, so we’re able to understand why we did things and we feel only compassion.”

“It felt as though those whom we label “perpetrators” are also victims of their own limitations, pain, and fear.  When we realize this, we feel only connection with everyone and everything. I understood that in the other realm, we’re all One. We’re all the same.”

“If everyone knew this, we wouldn’t need laws and prisons. But here, we don’t understand, so we think in terms of “us” and “them,” causing us to operate out of fear. This is why we have judgement, laws, prisons, and punishment. In this realm, at this time, we need them for our own protection. But on the other side, there’s no such thing as punishment, because once we’re there, we become aware that we’re all connected.”

I am a Christian and Anita is not. I have spoken with people who have had near death experiences and they have told me about seeing the light of God. I have a hard time believing that evil would suddenly disappear because the evil one died and they would be on the same level with someone like Saint Theresa.

I am thinking that maybe we see what we know. It is an amazing story and made me do a lot of thinking about the afterlife.  What are your thoughts? Have you ever talked with anyone who has had a near death experience? Let me know.

 

 

Flash Fiction Story and August Contest

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Brother

The laughter at the wedding reception makes my heart glad. I want a drink right now, none of that mild crap. How do I tell Gloria on her wedding day, her brother is dead? James was found nude, in a muddy ditch, murdered? How does one begin a sentence you know will destroy someone’s world? I’m hoping her marriage allows her to let loose of her obsessions concerning her brother.

“Detective Donavan, you finally made it,” Gloria yells, and begins laughing,as she runs to meet him.

Donavan walks to meet her. “I certainly did. What happened to your beautiful dress?”

“Oh clumsy me, I fell flat of my face in the mud.”

Now it’s your turn. Let’s see what you can do with this. Use the same words I did and come up with a FF story keeping it under 120 words. The winner will receive an ebook from Amazon of thier choice under $5.00. Deadline will be Friday, August 10th with a winner announced on the 11th. Send stories to shirley_mclain@yahoo.com.  Have Fun

Hunky Brother

A Question and A Short Story

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Hello everyone. I hope all are well today. I’m staying close to the airconditioning with this 112 degree heat today.  We need rain here in Oklahoma as well as surrounding states. Put your prayer caps on and place it before God. Besides that I have a question concerning your Spam folder. Do you consider everything that goes to spam as bad? When I read some of it, it sounds sincere. I’ve been deleting all of it without responding. Please let me know what you do with your spam.

Since I’m so slow with my next chapter of Sally’s Warning, I am posting a short story called Be Care of What You ask. As I have learned personally,  you may not really want it.  Enjoy

Be Careful of What You Want

Downtown Atlanta

Rebecca Jenkins gets off the bus and begins her block long walk, grumbling with every step.I don’t know why that had to be in the tallest building in Atlanta. I don’t like elevators and I sure don’t like heights. The gynecologist is on the fiftieth floor of the Bank of America (BOA) Building. I don’t know why he didn’t go to the top since it’s only fifty-five floors to start with.

Finally arriving at the BOA building, she goes though one set of six revolving doors. The temperature outside is in the upper nineties, so getting through those rotating doors into the lobby felt like heaven. Her natural curly, chestnut colored, hair is fuzzy because of the high humidity. Looking around the lobby, she spots the bank of elevators. I didn’t know one building could have this many elevators.

She pushes the up button on the elevator and stands back to see which door might open. Five other people are standing, waiting for an elevator. Rebecca always thought herself good at sizing people up. I wish I had more time to talk to these people and find out if my first thoughts of everyone are accurate. Well at least right now, I know there’s a nun in the group. She’s hard to miss in that black habit, Sally thought.

The elevator bell goes off and all six of the people began looking at the arrows at the top of the elevators to determine which one is ground level. The door to the middle elevator on the right side opens and the six walk on with the door closing behind them. Sally stood next to the buttons, so she asks what floor the other want. The Nun and a teenage girl say fifty and a woman holding a white tip cane whispers, “Forty-five, please.” The two men are going to fifty-three and fifty-five.

The elevator begins its climb with a bell sounding at every floor. Sally feels her anxiety building as the elevator climbs. I should be grateful this isn’t one of those glass elevators that go up the outside of the building. I know I couldn’t handle that kind at all. The silence is thick in the elevator. Everyone has their head down, but raises it with each ding of the bell.

The elevator ding sounds at the thirty-eighth floor and continues climbing. The elevator begins to shake and stops. “What happened?” Rebecca asks.

The mousy looking man with the black rimmed glasses begins talking “I can’t believe this shit. Excuse me, Sister. for my language. This isn’t acceptable. Lady, get on the emergency phone and get us some help. I have to pick up my son’s medication at his doctor’s office. They close at 4:30 pm.”

The nun speaks up, “Everyone please try to stay calm. I know we’ll be getting help very soon.”

“Did God tell you that information, Sister?” The teenage girl says in a sarcastic tone.

“Not this time, but he’s never failed me, so I’m not worried.”

Rebecca backs into the right front corner of the elevator. Gosh, I hope this thing hangs tight. At least we have a light. It would be completely terrifying if it were totally dark inside this thing.

The others don’t notice that she’s hung the phone up, except the good looking man that looks so angry. “Hey, what did they say? When will they get us out of here?” The good-looking man asks Rebecca.

“No one answers the phone, sir. I’ll try again in a couple of minutes.”

“Here, let me try”, the mousey man says. He pushs Rebecca aside and picks up the phone. It rang and rang, with no answer on the other end. He slams the receiver back onto the hook. “What a crock of shit this is, first we have a jacked up elevator and now no one will answer the emergency phone.”

“Let’s please stay calm,” the sister says. “Why don’t we talk and tell each other some details about ourselves and time will pass a little faster.” Everyone looks at her as if she no longer has good sense. “I’ll start. My name is Sister Margaret. I am with the Sisters of the Rosary, at Saint Michaels Convent. I have been a nun for almost twenty-six years. I certainly never thought I’d be in an elevator this afternoon with five other people. Okay, young lady, why don’t you take your turn.”

The teenager looks at Sister Margaret, “Okay, Sister, you got it. My name is Angie and I’m fifteen years old. God ain’t done one thing for me, so he’s done nothing but let me down.”

“Oh Angie, you just can’t see what he’s done for you, but I assure you he loves you and is with you every step you take,” Sister Margaret says.

“Is that a fact, Sister? Then I guess he was with me the night those three thugs raped me and left me for dead. In addition, to top that off, now I’m carrying a bastard baby. I’m sure God was right there with me the whole time.”

You can hear everyone suck in their breath when she speaks. Sister Margaret, gets down on the floor next to the young girl and takes hold of her hands. “I’m so sorry, Angie. I don’t know why bad things happen to good people, but they do. I know you’re angry at the world right now, but know I will help you any way I can. What about your parents, how do they feel?”

“That’s another good thing. My parents are dead. I live in the home for Girls on Piedmont. Yep, I can sure see where God is with me every step. Get up, Sister, and don’t worry about me. I can take care of myself.”

Sister Margaret continues to hold Angie’s hands. “Remember, I will help you. You don’t have to go through this alone. In fact, the convent has a very nice home for unwed mothers. It is a big improvement over the state run home on Piedmont. Just think about it and let me know when we get off the elevator.”

Letting go of Angie’s hands she stands and then bends over and touches Angie’s hair. As soon as Sister Margaret’s hand strokes her hair, Angie begins to cry. Tears run down  her cheeks, falling onto her pink blouse.

Everyone stands quietly for the next five minutes while Angie cries.

“I hope you feel better, dear, now that you’ve cried. It always helps me,” says the woman with the white tipped cane.

“When are they going to fix this elevator? I’ve only got twenty minutes to get to my son’s doctor.” The mousy little man  shouts out. Sister Margaret looks at him and asks, “Why don’t you tell us a little something about yourself.”

The mousy little man is shaking, agitated, and seems to have problems standing still. When he first begins to speak, you can hear his voice shaking. “Ah, my name is Arthur, and I work in this building for BOA as an accountant. I’m married with a six year old son who has been diagnosed with ADHD. That’s the reason I’ve got to get to the doctor’s office.”

“Mister, you look like you’re strung out. Are you sure you not taking your son’s drug.” Angie looks him straight in the eyes. “Your eyes are even twitching. Don’t bother lying, because I can recognize the symptoms. A couple of girls at the home are always strung out on something.”

“Shut your mouth you little bitch! You don’t know what you’re talking about.”

“That’s what you think,” Angie says.

“Please tell us more, Arthur,” Sister Margaret says.

“I don’t have anything else to say. I’m going to try this phone again. Maybe they’ll answer this time.” He picked up the phone, but still no answer. He slams the receiver down again, and begins screaming help.

The good-looking man steps over to him and places a hand on his shoulder. Leaning in, he whispers in
Arthur’s ear. Author immediately backs up into the corner and nothing moves except his quivering eyes
.
The good-looking man steps back. “Since I have everyone’s attention, why don’t I tell you about me? My name is Stephen Taylor, and I’m a Federal Supreme Court Justice taking a few days off to take care of some business. I’m married right now, but won’t be for long. I now have evidence my wife of twenty years is having an affair with my best friend.”

Sister Margaret spoke up. “Mr. Taylor, I’m so sorry for your troubles. I know it has to be hard on you right now, but don’t be too hasty in what you do. Give yourself some time to cool down before you make any decisions. I’ll pray for you and your wife.”

“That’s very kind of you, Sister. I can use all the prayer I can get. I’m afraid my wife has already made my decision for me. She left for Vegas this morning for a quickie divorce and plans to marry Martin as soon as possible.”

“I’m sorry to hear that, but you both will still get my prayers.”

The woman with the white-tip cane spoke up. “I guess I can take my turn now. My name is Candy Cross. As you can see, I’m blind and have been since birth. I was very angry about my blindness for a few of my teen years, but I got over that. Actually, I’m doing good. I own my own braille printing business and do very well. I’m not married and I do live on my own not too far from here. I’ve got a good life.”

Everyone speaks their congratulations, except Arthur. He’s still standing in the corner twitching. Then it is Rebecca’s turn.

“Hi, my name is Rebecca and I don’t like tall buildings or elevators, but here I am. I’m twenty-two years old and I’m working on my master’s degree in psychology. My home is in Lubbock, Texas, but I’ve been here for almost five years. I have to tell you that before I got on this elevator, I wished I’d had more time to spend with you, so I could find out about you. It’s my thing to try and figure people out. You surprised me, except for Sister Margaret. I’ve learned a little about each of you and a lot about myself. I don’t read people as well as I thought,and also be careful for what you ask for, because you might get it.”

The elevator lights flicker and they feel the elevator start down the shaft. Everyone cheers and pats each other’s back. They know their rescue is happening.

Recognized