Monthly Archives: July 2013

The Ant Philosophy

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This lesson by Jim Rohn has many lessons in it that we humans should take heed to. If everyone on a team works together to help everyone else it makes it easier to survive.  

I hope you enjoy this life lesson plan.   Shirley


by Jim Rohn

Over the years I’ve been teaching kids about a simple but powerful concept—the ant philosophy. I think everybody should study ants. They have an amazing four-part philosophy, and here is the first part: ants never quit. That’s a good philosophy. If they’re headed somewhere and you try to stop them, they’ll look for another way. They’ll climb over, they’ll climb under, they’ll climb around. They keep looking for another way. What a neat philosophy, to never quit looking for a way to get where you’re supposed to go.

Second, ants think winter all summer. That’s an important perspective. You can’t be so naive as to think summer will last forever. So ants gather their winter food in the middle of summer.

An ancient story says, “Don’t build your house on the sand in the summer.” Why do we need that advice? Because it is important to think ahead. In the summer, you’ve got to think storm. You’ve got to think rocks as you enjoy the sand and sun.

 
The Ant Philosphy

The third part of the ant philosophy is that ants think summer all winter. That is so important. During the winter, ants remind themselves, “This won’t last long; we’ll soon be out of here.” And the first warm day, the ants are out. If it turns cold again, they’ll dive back down, but then they come out the first warm day. They can’t wait to get out.

And here’s the last part of the ant philosophy. How much will an ant gather during the summer to prepare for the winter? All he possibly can. What an incredible philosophy, the “all–you–possibly–can” philosophy.

Wow, what a great philosophy to have—the ant philosophy. Never give up, look ahead, stay positive and do all you can.

 

FanBox has provided us with a unique opportunity to make money and to share what we know.  I was a Success Coach for a short period of time and I loved it. Unfortunatly I did not have the time that was needed to do justice to the program so I reseigned.  We can all be unoffical coaches, which I have seen everyday.

 

 

A Tigers Colors

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 A Golden Tiger
            The orange colored tiger with black stripes is, of course, the most prevalent. There are different shades of orange ranging from almost yellow to dark burnt orange. The stripes also vary in shade, size and abundance. Some tigers will have dark, wide stripes while some have fewer stripes that are narrower. It is interesting to note that every stripe pattern is unique. No two tigers are marked the same, much like a person’s fingerprints.
            Color and striping is controlled by gene groups that are inherited from the parent’s genes, the same as hair color in humans. A person may have dark hair and that would be the trait they most likely would pass on to their children, especially if both parents have the same color gene. If one parent has a dark hair, and the other has blond hair, the child will usually have dark hair because the gene for dark hair is dominant. In order for the child to have blonde hair, the parent with dark hair must also have a recessive gene for blonde hair. Then the child has a 50/50 chance to have either color hair. Recessive genes are what cause different color variations – in tigers as well as people. It is what causes a white tiger to be born from two standard colored parents.
Orange Tiger
            The orange colouring is the most common color of tiger. Every subspecies of tiger can be orange. Whereas some of the more exotic colours are limited to certain subspecies.
 Color Variations of A Tiger
White Tiger
            A white tiger is caused by the homozygous occurrence of a recessive allele in the genome. Estimations show that around one in 10,000 wild Bengal tiger births will result in a white tiger. The white tiger is not considered a tiger subspecies, but rather a mutant variant of the existing tiger subspecies.
 
 Color Variations of A Tiger
 
Snow White Tiger
            An additional genetic condition can remove most of the striping of a white tiger, making the animal almost pure white. One such specimen was exhibited at Exeter Change in England in 1820.  The modern strain of snow white tigers came from repeated brother–sister mating of Bhim and Sumita. The gene involved may have come from a Siberian tiger; continued inbreeding appears to have caused a recessive gene for stripelessness to show up.
 
 Color Variations of A Tiger
 
Golden Tabby Tiger
            It is sometimes referred to as the strawberry tiger due to the strawberry blonde coloration. A golden tabby tiger is one with an extremely rare color variation caused by a recessive gene and is currently only found in captive tigers. Like the white tiger, it is a color form and not a separate species. In the case of the golden tiger, this is the wide band gene; while the white tiger is due to the color inhibitor (chinchilla) gene. There are currently believed to be fewer than 30 of these rare tigers in the world. The golden tiger’s white coat and gold patches make it stand out from the norm. Their striping is much paler than usual and may fade into spots or large prominent patches. Golden tigers also tend to be larger and, due to the effect of the gene on the hair shaft, have softer fur than their orange relatives.
 
Color Variations of A Tiger
 
Maltese Tiger
            The Maltese tiger, or blue tiger, is a semi-hypothetical coloration morph of a tiger, reported mostly in the Fujian Province of China. It is said to have bluish fur with dark grey stripes. Most of the Maltese tigers reported have been of the South Chinese subspecies. The South Chinese tiger today is critically endangered, and the “blue” alleles may be wholly extinct. Blue tigers have also been reported in Korea, home of Siberian tigers. It is suggested that blue tigers possessed two different pairs of recessive alleles – the non-agouti (s/s), and the dilute (d/d) which combine to produce a solid blue-grey colour as found in domestic cats such as the British Blue and Russian Blue.
 
 Color Variations of A Tiger
Black Tiger
            A black tiger is a rare colour variant of the tiger and is not a distinct species or geographic subspecies. There are reports and one painting (now lost) of pure black non-striped tigers (true melanistic tigers). Most black mammals are due to the non-agouti mutation. Agouti refers to the ticking of each individual hair. In certain light, the pattern still shows up because the background color is less dense than the colour of the markings.
            So-called black tigers are due to pseudo-melanism. Pseudo-melanistic tigers have thick stripes so close together that the tawny background is barely visible between stripes. Such tigers are said to be getting more common due to inbreeding. They are also said to be smaller than normal tigers, perhaps also due to inbreeding or because large black leopards are misidentified as black tigers.
 Color Variations of A Tiger
There are reports that one of the three white tigers born in Vandalur zoo in June 2010 seems to have changed its colors — most of its body and legs are now black.
 
This is an article which was originally posted by Arun Kumar. I want to share it with you.  Tigers are beautiful creatures and as with many of the species of our world are in trouble.  Enjoy the reading and pictures.   Shirley