Monthly Archives: October 2013

Tatoo’s Through The Ages

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I have always had an interest in Archaeology and I’m especially fond of Old world Egypt.  In one of my magazines I found an article that really caught my attention. It was about Tattoos and about how far in our past they go back.

Tattoo's Across the AgesTattoo's Across the Ages

I have to admit I am not a big fan of Tattoos because I know over time they grow to look rather dull instead of the vibrant piece of art work they started out to be.  I also believe that some overdue the tattoos on their bodies, and that is a personal preference. It really is “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.”

People have been tattooing themselves for about 7000 years now. What makes a person decide to have a mark or picture put permenatly on their skin. Is it that constat drive to be different, to be set apart. It might also be a status symbol among some.

Tattoo's Across the AgesTattoo's Across the Ages

Otzi a copper age mummy found in Europe is probably the most famous tattooed man.  He died high in the Italian Alps more than 5,000 years ago.  Otzi’s body was almost perfectly preserved by snow and ice which covered him after his death.  Otzi had tattoo’s in the form of lines and crosses over his well worn ankles, wrists, knees , lower back and Achilles tendon.  When these lines were cut into the skin, charcoal was then rubbed into them.  Reasearcers now believe that they were theraputic in nature.  Was this the first form of accupuncture?

So thoughout the ages men and woman have dad tatoo’s for numerous different reasons. If you have one, what was your reasoning?

In the Greco-Roman world tattoo’s were a mark of shame and punishment. They tattooed crimianls, and slaves who tried to escape. When a country was invaded the victors would tattoo the inhabitants with their mark. Rome also tatooed slaves to show that taxes had been paid.  Bottom line is people have always come up with a reason why they needed tattoo’s.Tattoo's Across the Ages

My daughter received a tattoo across her lower back. She couldn’t explain to me why she did it other than she wanted it. Captain Cook was the first to use the verb “tattoo”.  It has even been around for a long time.  In 1769 he wrote in his diary about the Tahitian art of tatau. I guess that I will have to accept the fact the tattoo is not going to dissapear from this world’s society.

 

Halloween Thoughts

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by Power User Shirley McLain on October 10, 2013

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Halloween ThoughtsI thought of Halloween as an American Holiday but as usual when I think I know something, my thinking is wrong.  I probably thought that way because I had not heard of any other countries having a Halloween Holiday.  I wonder if it is practiced in the same way as America does it?

In my childhood the holiday was something I really looked forward to all year long. I knew once school started it wouldn’t be long before I could dress up so no one would know me and head out gathering up all of the candy, popcorn balls and all the many goodies that I could carry. I think my last year to trick or treat I got three large grocery bags full.  I do have to tell you that this was back in the 1950’s in a small town in California.

Halloween ThoughtsTimes changed as it always does and in the 1960’s it became a holiday that wasn’t celebrated as easily as it had been before.  Some real life demons got involved with the trick or treating and killed some children.  Drugs  and poison were added to the popcorn balls as well as ground glass, razor blades and what ever else sick minds could come up with. Everything that was not store bought was x-rayed or thrown away because of the danger.

In the 70’s when my children we big enough to trick or treat they couldn’t go out on the streets as I did and run and laugh. We lived in the country in SE Oklahoma so there were no paved streets lined with houses. They went to Halloween parties and dressed up in their costumes. If it was a church party, costumes were restricted to the non-demonic.  As I grew older I gave up on participating in the holiday at all.  I have to admit, I now hide.

If you want to find out more about the history of the holiday Wikipedia has a great article on the history of the Holiday.  I would like to know how you practice Halloween.  Leave me a comment and let me know your thoughts. Halloween2

I pray that everyone has a safe and happy Halloween, when it happens. We have almost three weeks before it happens here in the states.

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Here Kitty, Kitty

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I read this blog this morning and decided to repost it. I’m always curious why people gravitate towards a particular person, place, or thing. This blog is about a thing. Specifically about the Canadian Hairless Cat.

I don’t happen to be one that gravitates to this type of cat, but to each his own. I do hope you enjoy the article about how this cat was developed.

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Canadian Hairless Cats

 

canadian-sphynx-cat

Why don’t they have any fur ?

It’s a genetic defect. (I love Sphynx cats btw.. so awesome)

 

The Canadian Sphynx breed was started in 1966, in Roncesvalles, Toronto when a hairless kitten named Prune was born to a black and white domestic shorthair queen (Elizabeth) in Ontario, Canada. The kitten was mated with its mother (backcrossing), which produced one more naked kitten. Together with a few naked kittens found later it founded the first attempt to create a hairless breed.

After purchasing these cats in 1966 and initially referring to them as “Moonstones” and “Canadian Hairless,” Mr. Ridyadh Bawa, a science graduate of the University of Toronto, combined efforts with his mother Yania, a long time Siamese breeder, and the Tenhoves (Kees and Rita) to develop a breed of cats which was subsequently renamed as “Sphynx”. It is apparent that the Bawas and the Tenhoves were the first individuals able to determine the autosomal recessive nature of the Sphynx gene for hairlessness while also being successful in transforming this knowledge into a successful breeding program with kittens which were eventually capable of reproducing.

 

The Tenhoves were initially able to get the breed Provisional showing status through the Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA) but ultimately had the status revoked in 1971 when it was felt by the CFA Board that the breed lacked both a consistent standard and an adequately broad gene pool.

 

Canadian Hairless Cat3

The first noted naturally occurring foundation Sphynx originated at the Wadena, Minnesota farm of Milt and Ethelyn Pearson, who identified hairless kittens occurring in several litters of their Domestic Shorthair (DSH) barn cats in the mid-1970s. Two hairless female kittens born in 1975 and 1976, Epidermis and Dermis, became an important part of the Sphynx breeding programme and further hairless cats were found in Texas, Arkansas, and Minnesota. Modern Sphynx, therefore, trace their origins to the second Canadian bloodline and to the Minnesota cats.

 

The first breeders had rather vague ideas about Sphynx genetics and faced a number of problems. The genetic pool was very limited and many kittens died. There was also a problem with many of the females suffering convulsions. The last two descendants of Prune, a brother-sister pair, were sent to Holland in the 1970s, but the male was uninterested in mating and the female conceived only once, but lost the litter.

Canadian Hairless Cat2

The breeding program of these pioneers withered after this time with the final traceable Bawa line cats : Mewsi-Kal Johnny, Mewsi-Kal Starsky (Hugo Hernandez, Holland) and Prune’s Epidermis (David Mare, California), were unable to produce sustainable lines prior to being altered in the early 1980s.

In 1978 and 1980, two further hairless female kittens were found in Toronto and were sent to Holland to be bred with Prune’s last surviving male descendent. One female conceived, but she also lost the litter. By then, the one remaining male had been neutered, never having been interested in mating with any of the females. As a result, no modern Sphynx cats are traceable to Prune. With no male Sphynxes, breeders instead used sparsely-furred Devon Rex studs.

canadian-sphynx-kitten

In the early stages of the breed crosses with Devon Rex were used, but later this crossing was frowned upon because it caused health problems. Now the Canadian Sphynx is a breed with a sound genetic pool. Outcrossing is still permitted using guidelines set down in the “standards” from each Feline Association around the globe.

 

Originally Posted by Polaris  View Post