Tag Archives: 1950’s

The Best Of Times

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televisionWhen I watched this video I knew I had to share it. It is so full of memories for those of us raised in the 50’s and 60’s and will show the younger folks some of what they missed. Whoever put this video together did a great job. The music is great and it reminds me of how much I miss that time. It also reminds me that what goes around comes around. Parents didn’t like the music then and I sure more than a few don’t like today’s music. Isn’t it wonderful to know that Rock N Roll didn’t pull us all down to the pits of hell as everyone thought.

The old TV shows brought a smile to my face. Remembering my Saturday mornings with Rin Tin Tin, The Micky Mouse Club and so many more. I still like to watch Roy Rogers and the Cisco Kid on cable.

I do hope you enjoy this video as much as I did, so you can go back to those days, if only for a few minutes.

The Best Of Times Part Two.

Living By Example

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I believe that man is born inherently good. We are born with all of the goodness that God can bestow on one human being. How many cruel and evil babies have you seen? What you see is a miracle of God at its best. A perfect little human.

That child enters this world with nothing but trust, and remains that way until their brain has matured enough to begin seeing the world around them. What a child learns are what we as a human race teach them. Do you think that a child wakes up one morning thinking, “you know when I am seventeen, I’m going to be selling dope, and I might even rob a liquor store. I think for kicks I’ll shoot the person who’s there.”

What do you think this child learned while his mind was developing? Were mom and dad both working in order to take care of the family? Maybe the child was a latchkey kid who sat in front of the television for hours watching humans kill, beat and rape other humans. Laugh at others misfortune. It could have also been a case of a one-parent family where the child felt abandoned. There are multitudes of possible reasons. Bottom line is they learn by example.

This child may not have received any guidance from his/her parents, because they received none from theirs. How can a young adult make good choices concerning their life if their main role models didn’t teach and guide them. It makes it very easy to take guidance from other kids who don’t have guidance from their parents either.

We live an “anything goes” life style. Parents do their thing and kids do theirs. My parents were firm believers in the spare the rod spoil the child mentality. Their parenting skills came from what they saw and lived as children. My parenting skills were learned the same way. I believe I was a better parent than mine were, and my children are better at parenting than I am. I blame parents when kids are disrespectful, foul-mouthed or when they get into trouble. I know sometimes parents can’t control what is going on, but where were they when morals, values, right and wrong should have been taught.

I believe the majority of parents do the best they can concerning their children. What kind of favor are we doing future generations by not teaching children how to behave in public or at home for that matter?

I have two grown children who turned out well in spite of me. Do I have regrets about their raising? You bet I do. I wish I could do it over again, but that’s not possible. I have to live with my mistakes. I wish every household could be like the thirty minute shows in the 50’ and 60’s such as “My Three Sons, or Father Knows Best, and Leave It To Beaver. Wouldn’t our world be wonderful? We’d have perfect households with terrific kids who would talk to their parents about anything. They made mistakes, but not bad ones. Everything ended on a positive note.

Have we as a society created a future society with an attitude of “I’ll do what I want, when I want and I don’t care what happens to you.” It is a very scary thought to me what my grandchildren will have to deal with. How do you feel about it?

Do You Remember Ginger Rogers? (Don’t Underestimate An Old Broad)

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Watch and enjoy (link) Don’t Under Estimate An Old Broad   I was sent a video  and  email stating the video is of  Ginger Rogers, age ninty-two.  When I watched this video I was blown completely away.  I can’t say it is or isn’t Ginger Rogers, but whomever it is, astonishes me.  I wouldn’t have imagaed in my wildest dreams a ninty-two year old woman could make the moves this woman does.  Ginger Rogers was born July 16, 1911, in Independence, Missouri.   Her real name was Virginia Katherine McMath.  Ginger started danceing about the time she could walk.  By the age of fourteen she was touring .  She one the Texas State Charleston Contest and a chance to perfrom on the Interstate Theater Circuit for four weeks.  It last longer than four weeks.

I grew up in the 1950’s watching Ginger dance with Fred Astaire.  Even at a young age I loved watching the two of them dance together. They moved together as well as seperatly complementing each other.  They demonstrated to the world how two people working together can make something wonderful.

The woman in this video has been blessed by God.  She is dancing with her twenty-six year old great-grandson and doesn’t miss a beat.  Watch the video and enjoy.  It is a sight to see.  That’s my two-cents for today

Head For the Closet

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The mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after the dr...

Image via Wikipedia

I have been reading Fish of Gold’s blog about natural disasters.  There have been some very good comments since she was Freshly Pressed.  There were comments about disaster drills for tornadoes and hurricanes.  I made the comment the only drill we had when I went to school was a bomb drill.  That was not true when I got to really thinking about it.  We also had the earthquake drill where we got underneath our desks, and also the usual monthly fire drill, where we left the building in a quiet, orderly fashion.  The 1950’s was a wonderous decade.

I had to bring home a note from school, so my parents could choose what I should do just in case “the bomb” was dropped.  It seemed everyone stayed on edge.  I guess after the war, they thought we were fair game to be “nuked”.    My parents decided  I was to come home if an alert sounded.  There was a siren system set up for the town to use in case of emergencies.  The town of Benicia was built on the rolling hills.  It sits right on the bay and is not far from San Francisco.

My parents worked at the Benicia Arsnal until it closed in 1960; because it was a military base, it made everyone very nervous.  Everyone knew it would be the Arsnal that would be hit.  I remember hearing mom and dad talk about what could happen.  They also had my parents doing drills on their job, on what to do if the atomic bomb is dropped.  How much time you would have, depending on the drop site.

The people in power wanted to make sure everyone was totally aware of all possibilities.  In the middle of the night, the sirens started going off.  I remember being woke and thrown in the closet head first, and my sister coming in right on top of me.  The sirens  woke my mom and dad; because of all the training, they knew the bomb had been dropped.  In less than a minute the house began to sway and things started crashing to the floor.  It was an earthquake, not a bomb.  I guess they forgot to differentiate the siren sounds between what was a bomb and an earthquake.

I don’t remember doing anymore bomb drills after that little episode.   It was fine with me, trying to run as fast as you could for six blocks to get home, was not fun.

Fish of Gold really provoked some serious childhood memories.  Those bomb drills had not been thought of for years.  I guess the war was over, but no one felt that it was “really” over.  I can’t even start to think, the closet would have protected us from anything. It might have taken a second longer for the blast wave to get to us, but it would have arrived.  Thank God, it never happened the way people thought it would.  That’s my two-cents for today.