Tag Archives: aviation

Do You Do It, When Asked?

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cellphoneI was surprised when I heard the statistics of those who don’t. Being one of those people who usually follow the rules, I turned off my electronics before I boarded a plane. It seems the FFA is possibly going to lighten up a bit on their rules, but should they.

Electromagnetic waves put off by passengers electronics devices could interfere with an aircraft’s electronic controls. This would be things as the GPS navigation system. Let’s see now we’re on the plane and have just taken off and we are headed for New York. You look around and everyone is either talking on the phone or playing games on their ipad, ect. You get the idea. We are in the air a couple of hours and the captain announces overhead that we have to turn around because we have been flying towards Spokane Washington and something must have happened to the GPS system. Since this is my story just ignore the fact that the tower should have contacted them long before they discovered they were headed the wrong direction. So since everyone was late they missed their connecting flights.

Dozens of complaints are filed every year by commercial pilots because their instruments went haywire. After they asked the customers to check their electronics to be sure they were off, the problem cleared up. In 1993 the FFA put the ruling in place that the plane had to be above 10,000 feet before any electronic gadgets are turned on. Do you know why it’s 10,000 feet? The flight crew has enough time to react to the circumstances and possibly save our life.

A recent survey conducted showed 40% of passengers with electronics do not bother to turn them off. That’s only 10% less than half thumb their noses at the rules. I find that rather alarming.

Right now there are punishments in place for those who are caught.  Alec Baldwin was kicked off an American Airlines flight because he refused multiple times to stop playing a game on his Smartphone.  Last year there was about thirty police cars surrounding a plane at La Guardia Airport. Something really bad had happened. A man refused to turn off his cell phone during taxiing, so he was arrested. A Saudi Arabian passenger who flouted the cellphone ban in 2001 received seventy lases. “Ouch”

As I said in the beginning of this piece do we really want them to change the rules. Do you want to talk on the phone more and possibly risk your life. Something to think about.

The True Cost of Owning a Pet

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2Sophie 6 weeksHello all. I hope everyone has hada great start to their week. Todays blog was brought to you by Sophie, who spent the night at the emergency hospital after recieving a bite through the trachea from her big brother, Andy. It was a scary time. Our animals are basically are kids since ours have grown up and left. That’s a whole nother story, so I’ll let that go. The vet exam and the night at the hospital under observation was $500.00. I have insurance for my others, but not on Sophie yet, so it was directly out of our pocket. In comparison to human medical care and animal care, I think they run neck and neck. One is just as expensive as the other.   How much is that doggy (or kitty, or birdie) in the window really? The total price tag is probably a lot more than you think. By: Amanda Lilly

One look at those puppy-dog eyes and wagging tail and it’s easy for all your money smarts to fly out the window. Nonetheless, it is important to consider your lifestyle and budget before bringing home Fluffy or Fido. While there are many foreseeable expenses, such as food and toys, other costs may come as a shock. Need a dog walker, for instance? That can cost as much as $5,200 annually. Pet boarding can extract hundreds of dollars from your bank account, especially if you travel several times a year. Maybe your budget can easily accommodate regular pet-care expenses, but are you prepared for the higher costs of emergency care? It’s a question that some pet-adoption groups pose to would-be owners: How much money are you prepared to spend on Fido in an emergency? $1,000? $5,000? $10,000? What about for your hamster or parakeet? Over the years, the Longs had budgeted for emergency pet care, and they have pet insurance, so the financial hit wasn’t as bad as it could have been. The Longs are getting back more than $4,500 of their expenses from Bailey’s insurance. “Bailey is our family,” Long says, “so we just told the vet, ‘Do what you need to do.’ It didn’t occur to me until this was all over that some owners might have had to consider euthanasia as an option if they weren’t as prepared for all the bills. ”Robert Long, managing editor for Kiplinger.com, and his wife have spent more than $13,000 on their 7-year-old beagle, Bailey, this year alone. A sudden and extreme case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in May led to irreversible blindness and the surgical removal of Bailey’s eyes. Two months later, a ruptured disc in Bailey’s back required emergency surgery to resolve temporary rear-limb paralysis. “You don’t want to think about the worst-case scenario,” Long says, “but you should.” As veterinary procedures become more advanced, people are less likely to put their pet to sleep when it gets severely sick or injured. Owners will likely incur at least one $2,000 – $4,000 bill for emergency care at some point during their pet’s lifetime, says Dr. Louise Murray, vice-president of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital, in New York City. The prospect of such high costs weighs heavily on many pet owners. Almost half said they were extremely or somewhat worried that they would not be able to afford veterinary care if their pet got sick, according to a 2010 survey by the Associated Press and Petside.com. “The biggest problem I see are people who assume that everything will be fine until their pet is 18 years old,” said Murray. “That’s just incredibly rare. You want to have a plan.” Preventive care is also important in corralling costs. Having a pet is “kind of like owning a car,” Murray says. “If you don’t do what you’re supposed to do, it will end up being a lot more expensive in the end.” That means getting your pet spayed or neutered, going to the vet for annual check-ups, keeping your pet’s vaccinations and preventive medicines up to date, feeding you pet the proper food, and keeping your pet confined indoors or in a yard and out of harm’s way. Although the cost of routine care is more predictable, it varies widely from animal to animal, and even from breed to breed — and also from owner to owner. For instance, fish and reptiles can drain your wallet by increasing the cost of your electric bill. Larger breeds of dogs will eat a lot more food than, say, a Chihuahua, and long-haired pets will need to go to the groomer more often. If you have allergies, you may need to get a hypoallergenic pet, which usually costs more both initially and in the long run. If you are away from home a lot, you may need to consider doggy day care or a dog walker, two services that add significantly to your total cost of ownership.

Oxygenated water nonsense Part 2

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Oxygenated water nonsense

Junk science in the marketplace

 Unless you have gills, it’s just an expensive burp!

oxygenated water2Part 2

This is part two of an article posted by a retired chemistry college professor concerning the fallacy of Oxygenated Water and other hypes.

Not just for drinking!

Oxygen in your bath

The MicroSilk™ Hydrotherapy site hypes baths and spas featuring a recirculating aeration spout which “saturates the water with billions of oxygen-rich microbubbles, increasing oxygen levels up to 70% higher than common tap water.” Well, so probably can any aerating faucet, but to describe the bubbles as “oxygen rich” is a bit much, given that air is only 20% oxygen. They go on to make the ridiculous claims that

“This luxurious cloud of oxygen blankets your body, energizing skin cells, stimulating the immune system, killing bacteria and promoting healing, reaching where mere water and soaps can’t, entering your pores, bonding to impurities and gently lifting them away, leaving your skin soft and clean in a way you’ve never experienced. MicroSilk™ also creates therapeutic levels of anions, which are known to improve serotonin levels, helping to relax the mind and body, promoting deep sleep, and enhancing recovery from physical exhaustion.”

“Eloptic” water hype

This thankfully now-departed site promoted “Electrically engineered eloptic energized stabilized oxygenated water” (sounds impressive!) which was described as

…an industrial-strength, multi-purpose cleanser that will meet all your personal care and household needs. This God-given, concentrated formula is made from all natural ingredients that will clean, degrease and deodorize anything, from your glass and mirrors, carpet and upholstery and even heavy cleaning such as grease traps and oil spots on the concrete garage floor to your baby’s bottom.

Well, I don’t think I would want to apply something strong enough to remove grease from the garage floor to my bottom, which is admittedly far less soft and supple than that of a baby! Among the ingredients are “ash of dedecyl solution (foaming agent), sea grass (for color) and the anointing of God.”

“Nobody has Enough Hydrogen or 02, Not on this Planet”

This is one of many lies offered up by an outfit that flogs a worthless “oxygen-plus” supplement to the scientifically challenged at $22 per bottle.

The air we breathe formerly contained 50 percent oxygen. But today, we only have about 20 percent in our air and there is even less in large cities. The medical profession has confirmed that most viruses, parasites, bacteria, fungus and pathogens are anaerobic—they CANNOT live in oxygen. If we are not getting enough oxygen, our bodies become fertile breeding grounds for disease.

The “50% oxygen” is of course pure fiction. And yes, many bacteria are anaerobic, but few viruses, parasites and fungi are. And these hucksters fail to mention that O2 is a cellular poison in the wrong locations and the source of those nasty free radicals that are supposed to accelerate aging. But if oxygen supplements can hook the suckers, so can hydrogen, so the fibbing continues:

The purpose of hydrogen is to give structure to the body. What do you get when you bubble hydrogen through vegetable oil? You get margarine! Now, imagine hydrogen without oxygen. Your cells could become like margarine. [link] remember that it is the smallest Critical Element and is capable of passing through the cell wall. In order for our cells to function they m”ust communicate with each other through electrons but electrons can not move in the body without hydrogen. Cells must have oxygen but oxygen does not work without hydrogen. Cells cannot multiply or grow without hydrogen. The very fabric of our being, our DNA, is held together by Hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen is literally the fuel of life. [link]

When we are born we have plenty of Hydrogen but as we age our Hydrogen pool becomes depleted. When this occurs, free radicals steel it from essential areas thus accelerating aging and disease. [link]

The Big Pitcher

The Big Pitcher is a water-oxygenator which is misleadingly claimed to remove chlorine, radon and sulfur, neutralize harmful bacteria, and increase ones energy and metabolism, improve sleep patterns, etc. etc.

…and deuterium too!

In my humble opinion, there are few health-quackery Web sites that contain a higher proportion of false and deceptive statements than those promoting Cellfood:

Cellfood is created by a proprietary nine month process in which these all-natural nutrient-rich plant substances are held in a negatively-charged suspension of deuterium (an isotope of hydrogen).

Deuterium? Well, this stuff is present in water in trace amounts (1 out of every 6500 hydrogen atoms), but the above statement can easily fool the majority of people who don’t know this. And the “negatively-charged” stuff is similar nonsense.

According to one sales site for this classic snake-oil:

[Our product] has the unique ability to disassociate the water molecule into nascent hydrogen and nascent oxygen. This water “splitting” technology enables the release of hydrogen and oxygen gases simultaneously in a chain reaction that involves one five-hundred thousandths of the available moisture at one time. Water “splitting” is achieved by means of shifting and weakening the bonding electrons (ionic transfers) of the water molecule towards oxygen and away from hydrogen. [It] allows the bonds in the electron distribution to be unsymmetrical (polar). [link]

Anyone who has taken even an elementary chemistry course will recognize this as erroneous nonsense. There are the usual unsubstantiated and ridiculous health claims (“aids clear thinking”, “helps to reduce and/or eliminates menopausal hot flashes and night sweats”). The product itself is described as a

“super energized colloidal mineral concentrate. … Di-base, Di-pole Deuterium Sulfate provides an incredible oxygen source and delivery system to the body at the cellular level.”

Deuterium sulfate? Deuterium is the isotope H2 (often given the symbol D) which makes up about 1 out of 10,000 of the hydrogen atoms found in nature. Although extensive research has shown that organisms are unable to survive on heavy water (D2O is well-known to thoroughly gum up most enzymatic reactions), the same sites go on about its supposed benefits, spinning a tale about an inventor/con-artist/imaginary (take your pick!) Everett M. Storey and a ficticious “Deuterium Freedom Act” purportedly passed by the U.S. 99th Congress that confirms deuterium’s ability to “speed up the digestive process”. However, the extensive list of chemicals in CellFood does not mention deuterium, although the list does include such falsely-claimed-to-be-beneficial elements as actinium, gadolinium, neon, technetium (!) and xenon. Another sad case of selling snake-oil to the suckers.

Stable fables: oxidants are actually good for you!

FTC Attacks “Stabilized Oxygen” Claims

‘Various products referred to as “stabilized” or “aerobic” oxygen are being marketed with claims that they can cure disease by increasing oxygen delivery to the cells. Some claim that “oxygen deficiency” or “oxygen starvation” is an underlying cause of disease and has been increasing because the oxygen content of the earth’s atmosphere has been decreasing and junk food does not contain enough oxygen…’ See the entire article here.

See also this cease-and-desist letter that the U.S. FDA has sent to Aerobic Oxygen USA.

A huge part of the alternative-health-quackery industry is devoted to supplying those free-radical fighters known as antioxidants (Whose benefits as dietary supplements are entirely unproven— but that’s another subject.) But pseudoscience knows no bounds and can be twisted in any direction, so here’s an Idaho company (where else?) that flogs a nostrum they call stabilized oxygen. A thankfully-now-disappeared Web site goes on at great length about the importance of protecting our cells from oxygen deprivation:

Oxygen plays another important role in the body acting as a guardian and protector against unfriendly bacteria and disease organisms. One of oxygen’s major functions is disintegration. Rubble, garbage, toxins, refuse, debris, and anything useless are destroyed by oxygen and carried out of the system. Just as a clean house holds little interest to passing flies, likewise, an oxygen rich body is a difficult fortress to assail.

… all errant nonsense, of course! Anyway, they go on about how their product helps you to enjoy the tremendous benefits of oxygen to the body other than through the breathing process. Oxygen is very difficult to stabilize and until a recent scientific breakthrough, oxygen has not been stabilized in a beneficial non-toxic form.

This flapdoodle overlooks the fact that oxygen is not present in the blood as O2, but is complexed to hemoglobin which controls the amount of oxygen delivered to cells through an exquisitely-evolved feedback mechanism. What these hucksters mean by “stabilizing” the oxygen is not entirely clear. We are told that

Stabilized oxygen is an oxide of chlorides compound stabilized with the richest known source of nascent oxygen with several atoms per molecule. Whatever they mean by “oxide of chlorides compound” could be any number of substances from chlorine dioxide (ClO2) to perchloric acid (HClO4). The first is a poison and the second is explosive, so I presume they have come up with something in between. The term “nascent oxgyen” (see below) usually means free oxygen atoms as opposed to the stable molecule O2 which make up 20% of the air we breathe. But it gets more complicated:

[This product] is a safe, non toxic, stabilized liquid concentrate of electrolytes of oxygen, which are made available to your body, in molecular form, when ingested. … The genius of it is the formulating of the two most abundant and important electrolytes of body fluid, sodium and chlorine, to act as the oxygen carriers. The molecular oxygen is released through the digestive process, and is absorbed into the bloodstream. … In an ordinary glass of tap water there is on the average, 7-12 ppm of oxygen molecules. In Stabilized Oxygen the amount of available oxygen increased to about 12,000 ppm or 1,000 times.

Wow! This appears to be a good description of sodium hypochlorite NaOCl, otherwise known as laundry bleach. Thanks, but I think I’ll pass on this one!

“Nascent” oxygen dietary supplement nonsense

The ordinary oxygen that we breathe is really the molecule”dioxygen”, O2. “Nascent” oxygen (a term not used much by contemporary chemists) refers to plain oxygen atoms. These species normally have only a transient existence before they react with themselves (to produce O2), with water to produce hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (a cellular poison), or with just about any carbon-containing substance around them— such as your body! Any claims that this stuff can posssibly be good for you or that it can somehow “stabilized” are plain lies. Also, any agent capable of generating atomic oxygen (as chemists call it) would do even more damage to the body, so I think claims that any dietary supplements can even produce it are untrue.

None of this appears to stop various outfits from hawking oxygenated snake oils such as the one making claims that their product

is unique in its ability to create nascent (meaning newly-born) oxygen. In biochemical terms ‘nascent’ oxygen refers to the newly born singlet oxygen (O-) that has not yet entered the biochemical reaction. Free radicals (which many biochemists believe are a primary cause of aging and degenerative disease) are positively charged ions of oxygen (O+). Since nascent oxygen molecules are negatively charged, they actually seek out and attract these dangerous free radicals, combining with them to form simple pure stabilized oxygen (O2).

Well, ionized atomic oxygen (O– or O+) does exist in the upper atomosphere, but it would be instant death to any body tissues. And far from being a free radical fighter, any form of the “singlet” oxygen they refer to is either itself a free radical or capable of producing them when it reacts with water or virtually any other cellular component. If you feel comfortable consuming a product from an outfit that exhibits this level of chemical incompetence, be my guest!

Of course they don’t stop there, but go on to evoke even weirder pseudoscience, claiming that the product

will tend to normalize the body’s acid-base balance by delivering its 78 essential minerals as enzymatic cofactors— assisting critical enymatic reactions to proceed optimally.

… which is biochemical hokum, and

Scientists Simeonton, Likhovsky and Bovis estimated that the average human body radiates a life force frequency of 6,500 angstroms— with cancer patients radiating at 1,875 angstroms (the same measurement as for refined white bread). Just one drop of [the product’s] powerful ‘electromagnetic equation’ in 6-8 ounces of water emanates 77,000 units of radiant life energy— bringing a dramatic increase in life force to every cell of the body.

… pure nonsensical fantasy.

But if this is not enough, a product formerly hyped as “Seven-Sided Oxygenated Water” “penetrates into dehydrated structures of the body and breaks apart the ionic bonds of substance or structure that are atypical to the bodies normal function.” This site is a fount of misinformation (for example, that the atmospheric concentration of oxygen has been rapidly decreasing over the last millenium, and that this, and anaerobic conditions in general, promote cancer.) They make the highly dubious claim that their bottled water contains 400-600 ppm of oxygen. And of course it protects the body from infection, helps reduce pain levels, and enhances carbohydrate metabolism, etc. etc. The current product site is not quite as goofy.

Ozonated water and ozone therapy

Ozone, O3, is a gas that it widely used to disinfect municipal water supplies. Being highly unstable, it decomposes into ordinary oxygen by the time the water reaches the consumer. Which is just as well, since ozone is toxic to both plant and animal cells.

But some hucksters don’t seem to know this. One of them tells us that

Ozone is used extensively in medicine in Germany and Cuba by either infusing it or injecting it directly into the blood stream. In medical applications: “It is the aim of ozone-oxygen therapy to stimulate or reactivate oxygen metabolism, without damage to the protecting oxidative enzymes…

Don’t believe this crap! Ozone attacks mucous membranes, destroys enzymes, and gobbles up DNA. Far from preventing cancer, it acts as a carcinogen. The guy behind this is apparently one Robert C. Beck, “D.Sc.”, described here as an “acclaimed physicist” (who, as far as I can see, has no record of scientific publication). This site seems to be associated with a variety of goofy quack treatment methods.

Another site is full of “testimonials” attesting to the miraculous effects of ozone in curing cancer, and yet another promotes a variety of ozone-quackery.

See this QuackWatch page for more about oxygen- and ozone therapy.

Oxygen skin-care

Will these “oxygen-infused skin serums bring life and health to the skin”? It’s true that the living tissue beneath the dead epidermal layer requires oxygen which is supplied by diffusion from the blood, and a 2010 article shows that “topical dissolved oxygen” can penetrate skin and may be useful aid to wound healing.  But if there is any clinical support for the idea that highly oxygenated waters can benefit ordinary skin, the developers of this “Gas infusion Technology” for supersaturating water with oxygen make no mention of it.

Oxygenating colon cleanser

This misinformation-filled site promotes a magnesium oxide preparation, which they claim will liquify all that solid gunge that is supposed to be clogging your intestines. Well, by the time magnesium oxide has passed through the stomach, it becomes magnesium chloride which acts as a mild laxative. To add to the hype, they claim that the product releases “monatomic oxygen” into the intestinal tract. It is just as well that this claim is almost certainly false, since atomic oxygen is a known carcinogen.

By using Oxy-Powder, you can melt away or oxidize the compaction from the small intestine, large intestine and colon safe and effectively. Organic Germanium-132 has demonstrated in multiple scientific studies to be a powerful oxygen facilitator and immune system stimulant. Oxy-Powder is also harmless to the good bacteria in the intestinal tract.

The stuff about Germanium-132 introduces another favorite food-fad that the FDA is beginning to crack down on because of fears of Germanium poisoning; there is no credible scientific evidence that it has any benefit.


 

 Article posted by Stephen Lower, Retired faculty member of Simon Fraiser University, Vancouver Canada.