Tag Archives: Dog

The True Cost of Owning a Pet

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2Sophie 6 weeksHello all. I hope everyone has hada great start to their week. Todays blog was brought to you by Sophie, who spent the night at the emergency hospital after recieving a bite through the trachea from her big brother, Andy. It was a scary time. Our animals are basically are kids since ours have grown up and left. That’s a whole nother story, so I’ll let that go. The vet exam and the night at the hospital under observation was $500.00. I have insurance for my others, but not on Sophie yet, so it was directly out of our pocket. In comparison to human medical care and animal care, I think they run neck and neck. One is just as expensive as the other.   How much is that doggy (or kitty, or birdie) in the window really? The total price tag is probably a lot more than you think. By: Amanda Lilly

One look at those puppy-dog eyes and wagging tail and it’s easy for all your money smarts to fly out the window. Nonetheless, it is important to consider your lifestyle and budget before bringing home Fluffy or Fido. While there are many foreseeable expenses, such as food and toys, other costs may come as a shock. Need a dog walker, for instance? That can cost as much as $5,200 annually. Pet boarding can extract hundreds of dollars from your bank account, especially if you travel several times a year. Maybe your budget can easily accommodate regular pet-care expenses, but are you prepared for the higher costs of emergency care? It’s a question that some pet-adoption groups pose to would-be owners: How much money are you prepared to spend on Fido in an emergency? $1,000? $5,000? $10,000? What about for your hamster or parakeet? Over the years, the Longs had budgeted for emergency pet care, and they have pet insurance, so the financial hit wasn’t as bad as it could have been. The Longs are getting back more than $4,500 of their expenses from Bailey’s insurance. “Bailey is our family,” Long says, “so we just told the vet, ‘Do what you need to do.’ It didn’t occur to me until this was all over that some owners might have had to consider euthanasia as an option if they weren’t as prepared for all the bills. ”Robert Long, managing editor for Kiplinger.com, and his wife have spent more than $13,000 on their 7-year-old beagle, Bailey, this year alone. A sudden and extreme case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in May led to irreversible blindness and the surgical removal of Bailey’s eyes. Two months later, a ruptured disc in Bailey’s back required emergency surgery to resolve temporary rear-limb paralysis. “You don’t want to think about the worst-case scenario,” Long says, “but you should.” As veterinary procedures become more advanced, people are less likely to put their pet to sleep when it gets severely sick or injured. Owners will likely incur at least one $2,000 – $4,000 bill for emergency care at some point during their pet’s lifetime, says Dr. Louise Murray, vice-president of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital, in New York City. The prospect of such high costs weighs heavily on many pet owners. Almost half said they were extremely or somewhat worried that they would not be able to afford veterinary care if their pet got sick, according to a 2010 survey by the Associated Press and Petside.com. “The biggest problem I see are people who assume that everything will be fine until their pet is 18 years old,” said Murray. “That’s just incredibly rare. You want to have a plan.” Preventive care is also important in corralling costs. Having a pet is “kind of like owning a car,” Murray says. “If you don’t do what you’re supposed to do, it will end up being a lot more expensive in the end.” That means getting your pet spayed or neutered, going to the vet for annual check-ups, keeping your pet’s vaccinations and preventive medicines up to date, feeding you pet the proper food, and keeping your pet confined indoors or in a yard and out of harm’s way. Although the cost of routine care is more predictable, it varies widely from animal to animal, and even from breed to breed — and also from owner to owner. For instance, fish and reptiles can drain your wallet by increasing the cost of your electric bill. Larger breeds of dogs will eat a lot more food than, say, a Chihuahua, and long-haired pets will need to go to the groomer more often. If you have allergies, you may need to get a hypoallergenic pet, which usually costs more both initially and in the long run. If you are away from home a lot, you may need to consider doggy day care or a dog walker, two services that add significantly to your total cost of ownership.

Sophie, Designer Dog

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2Sophie 6 weeksI got a puppy for Christmas as a gift from a family member.  Her name is Sophie. She is the product of two registered dogs. Unfortunately one is Dachshund and the other is Shih Tzu. Mother nature came up with a very unique breed. She has short hair like a Dachshund with long hair patches like the Shih Tzu. She has floppy ears and a turned up tail.  What this darling will look like as a grown dog is anyone’s guess.

I know they have come up with names for some planned designer breeds, such as the Yorkiepoo. I don’t know if they is a fancy name for Sophie’s breed. Maybe a Dachshih or a Dach Tzu. If any one knows what this particular mix  is called, let me know.

How do you feel about designer breed dogs? I for one think they are really just our normal every day mutts. I suppose someone thought if they came up with clever names they could be sold for more money. You know they were pretty smart, because people do buy designer breeds and pay big money for them.

Enjoy the video on designer dogs:   http://youtu.be/YFCoBkHMpIY

Pets

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The Dogs of Babel

Image via Wikipedia

I received this from a friend of mine this morning and I had not read it before so I thought I would share it with my blog friends.  I’m a dog lover from start to finish but it has caused me to experience rolled eyes from some of my family and friends.  I have four dogs, Andy is a thirty-five# Cocker, Booker, four  pounds of pure energy, Eddy is 15 pounds of laid back love and then there is Angel who is a five-pound poodle princess and knows it.  They have trained me well. I sometimes feel as if I have a houseful of three-year olds.  I wouldn’t trade it for the world.  I receive much more from them than I can give.

How do you feel about your pets?  Does it bother you if someone won’t come to your house because you have dogs?  Let me know.  I’m interested to know your thoughts on the subject.

The following was found posted very low on a refrigerator door: Dear Dogs and Cats:  The dishes with the paw prints are yours and contain your food.  The other dishes are mine and contain my food.  Placing a paw print in the middle of my plate and food does not stake a claim for it becoming your food and dish, nor do I find that aesthetically pleasing in the slightest. The stairway was not designed by NASCAR and is not a racetrack.  Racing me to the bottom is not the object.  Tripping me doesn’t help because I fall faster than you can run. I cannot buy anything bigger than a king sized bed.  I am very sorry about this.  Do not think I will continue sleeping on the couch to ensure your comfort, however.  Dogs and cats can actually curl up in a ball when they sleep.  It is not necessary to sleep perpendicular to each other, stretched out to the fullest extent possible.  I also know that sticking tails straight out and having tongues hanging out on the other end to maximize space is nothing but sarcasm. For the last time, there is no secret exit from the bathroom! If, by some miracle, I beat you there and manage to get the door shut, it is not necessary to claw, whine, meow, try to turn the knob or get your paw under the edge in an attempt to open the door.  I must exit through the same door I entered.  Also, I have been using the bathroom for years – canine/feline attendance is not required. The proper order for kissing is:  Kiss me first, then go smell the other dog’s or cat’s butt.  I cannot stress this enough. Finally, in fairness, dear pets, I have posted the following message on the front door:

TO ALL NON-PET OWNERS WHO VISIT AND LIKE TO COMPLAIN ABOUT OUR PETS: (1)  They live here.  You don’t. 

(2)  If you don’t want their hair on your clothes, stay off the furniture.  That’s why they call it ‘fur’-niture. 

(3) I like my pets a lot better than I like most people. 

(4)  To you, they are animals..  To me, they are adopted sons/daughters who are short, hairy, walk on all fours and don’t speak clearly. Remember, dogs and cats are better than kids because they:

(1) eat less,

(2) don’t ask for money all the time,

(3) are easier to train,

(4) normally come when called,

(5) never ask to drive the car,

(6) don’t hang out with drug-using people;

(7) don’t smoke or drink,

(8) don’t want to wear your clothes,

(9) don’t have to buy the latest fashions,

(10) don’t need a gazillion dollars for college and

(11) if they get pregnant, you can sell their c