Tag Archives: England

Is It a Government Conspiracy?

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Meriwether Lewis

I watched a television program last night that totally fascinated me. It was about Meriwether Lewis. Those of you who are not familiar with him, I will tell you a little about his background. He was born on August 18, 1774 in Charlottesville, Virginia. He became a soldier, served under William Clark who he later picked to be co-charge for the great exploration of the west, authorized by Thomas Jefferson.  Meriwether started out as the personal secretary to President Jefferson, but Jefferson gave him another job to explore the Louisana Purchase and  westward.

President Jefferson also gave them a mandate to see if there were signs of Welch occupancy in the west. Since Lewis had served under William Clark, they knew each other well. The two gathered their supplies and other men and left for the unknown in May 1804.

Meriwether Lewis kept journals of everything he saw during his mission. He retured in May 1806.  Documentation along with drawings showed President Jefferson what was seen on the journey.

Three years after returning home, Meriwether was going back to Washington DC with his Journals  He was staying at an Inn on the Natchez Trace. The Trace was a well used 440 mile trail from Mississippi to Tennessee.  At the Inn on October 12, 1809, a couple of gun shots were heard and Meriwether Lewis was found dead. He had one shot in the abdomen and one through the head, with blew part of the skull off exposing the brain. It was ruled as a suicide.

Since that time there has been a theory that the United States Government had him killed because he had found something during the expedition that would threaten the United States right to the lands west of the Mississippi. Such as the Welch having been there before which would give England the right to the land.

Pages had been torn from his journal and were never seen again. Lewis was a Mason and had his apron in his pocket. When they removed it, it was blood spattered. The apron is on display in Montana. Blood samples were taken and it has been shown that it came from two different men and not Meriwether Lewis.

I think it’s fascinating to know that even back when the country was new that a National Hero could have been killed because of knowledge he had that could harm the government. It’s something we will never know for sure but does make for a good story.

Men and combat with the GPS (Global Positioning System)

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I have a husband who always has a better route than the GPS.  Sometimes he is wrong and sometimes he is right.  When we were first getting to know each other (before GPS), he told me he was the great pathfinder.  I have to admit he did pretty darn good.  I on the other hand couldn’t find my way out of a wet paper bag.  The invention of the GPS was a God send for me.  Whatever the GPS tells me to do, I’m doing it.  I have found for myself  if I don’t follow the GPS, I make twenty phone calls asking “where are you located.  I’m at such and such right now. ” It’s a pain in my tail as well as whomever I’m supposed to be seeing at the time.

I sometimes think my husband sees the GPS as a challenge to his manhood.  You know it’s kind of like asking for directions.  We’ve had more than one squabble because he wouldn’t stop and ask for directions.  I never have understood that part of male thinking at all.  That is one of those mysteries of life for me.

I read an article in Reuters of a survey that was done in England concerning the GPS.  Here are five of the conclusions they came up with.

1.  Men are more likely to ignore directions given by their GPS than women.  They have confirmed that men hate asking for directions.

2.  While 83 percent of male drivers regularly rebel against their GPS, less than three-quarters of woman disobey the devices.

3.  “A sat nav should aid your own navigational abilities rather than replace them,” said Steve Chelton (clearing my throat as I think “man”.)

4. Over one-third of drivers said the GPS had led them between one and five miles way, and half of these said the GPS had triggered an argument with a passenger.

5. Of 3000 motorists surveyed, almost two-thirds said they  kept a map in their vehicles “just in case.”

I have to admit that I have a map in my car just in case the GPS breaks.  It has happened to me and the anxiety it caused taught me to always have a back-up.  Sometimes I have to waste paper because I print off directions from Google or Map Quest to where I’m going.  When I do that it makes me feel guilty for wasting our resources.

That survey  done in England  continued to show me people are people and we tend to share the same problems, no matter what country it’s in.

A Christmas Past

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I was sent the following Santa letter from a friend today.  It got me to thinking about  how different the Christmas wants of today are from what they were 100 years ago, or are they?

The letter was from a boy they think, written over 100 years ago and found on a fireplace shelf that somehow survived over the century.  What do kids ask for today? Dolls, clothes, electronics, candy, ect. ect.  This child asked for very similar items.  Not the electronics of course, since they weren’t available at the time.

In many ways I think the contrast between what the child wanted with what todays children want shows both how our world has changed and at the same time remained the same. The childs list was simple and didn’t sound like much, but I’m sure that childs wants would have cost quite a bit 100 years ago.

Please enjoy the letter and let me know your thoughts.

Dear Santa Letter sent 100 years ago found up chimney

MICHAEL O’REGAN and PAMELA DUNCAN

IT MAY have been slightly scorched over the years but a letter to Santa written 100 years ago, which was later discovered in a Dublin fireplace, has the magic of Christmas written all over it.

On Christmas Eve 1911, a brother and sister, who signed their names, “A or H Howard”, penned their personally designed letter to Santa with their requests for gifts and a good luck message at their home in Oaklands Terrace, Terenure (or Terurnure, as the children spelled it) in Dublin.

They placed it in the chimney of the fireplace in the front bedroom so that Santa would see it as he made his way into the Howard household in the early hours of the morning.

The letter was discovered by the house’s current occupant, John Byrne, when he was installing central heating in 1992.

Since then, he has retained it as a souvenir of another time and place but with the stamp of childhood innocence which still exists today.

The message to Santa was warm but explicit.

“I want a baby doll and a waterproof with a hood and a pair of gloves and a toffee apple and a gold penny and a silver sixpence and a long toffee.”

Ownership of the house changed over the decades, with the Byrne family moving there in 1961, but the letter survived.

“At that time, the fireplaces were made of brick with a shelf on either side,” said John Byrne who works in the building industry.

“The letter was found on one of the shelves.”

The letter remained remarkably intact given the passage of time and was only slightly burned from fires set in the house over the years.

As well as the requests for gifts from Santa the letter also contains drawings and a message of “Good Luck” to Santa from the children.

According to the 1911 census there were three children living at the address in the year in which the letter was written.

The youngest of them, Hannah, who was 10 at the time, and Fred (presumably short for Alfred) who was seven, fit in with the initials on the letter.

A third child, a 13-year-old called Lily, is also listed.

The Howard family were all born in England, including parents Fred Hamer Howard, an “under manager” in a plumber merchants, and his wife Mary Elizabeth. They listed their religion as Church of Ireland.

More On Ginger Rogers and Never Underestimate An Old Gal

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http://youtu.be/3O-o5gwi4HI During my orignal Blog about this woman the video says is Ginger Rogers, I said I was not sure it was her or not.  I have since found out it is not Ginger.  According to The London Times, the womans name is Sarah “Paddy” Jones and she is seventy-five years old.  She is from England, but relocated to Spain.  Her partner is Nicholas Espluosa, her thirty-five year old dance instructor.  The pair is popular in Spain and made it to their number two spot.

Her husband died six years ago and Mrs Jones took up Salsa to help her recover from her husband’s death.  This grandmother of six is now globe-trotting “doing her thing.”  She began dancing at the age of two, training for ballet, tap and Greek dancing.  When she married at age twenty-two, she gave up her dancing career and became a dental nurse.  After working as a dental nurse she and her husband ran a fabric shop.

She plans on continuing her career in dance as long as she is able to.  I think she is absolutely wonderful to be able to move as she does and share her talent with all who see her.  Wouldn’t it be nice if we could all move like she does?  I can hardly raise my leg, much less put it up beside my head.  She has been blessed and I am happy for her.  That’s my two cents for today.