Tag Archives: Food

What They Don’t Tell You

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What They Don’t Tell you

I am obese, fat, fluffy, heavy, big boned or whatever term you want to call me, a person that weighs to much. I have been heavy all of my life that I can remember. I can also say that I love to eat good tasting food. Being 65 years old (all most) I am now developing or have developed some of the problems that go along with my weight.

I have tried every diet and quick fix under the sun. At one time when I lived in Hawaii I lost 110 pounds. I was walking, dancing, scuba diving and having the time of my life. I came back to the mainland and all that stopped. I was in contrast turmoil over my son being in Iraq during Desert Storm. I am a stress eater and I gained every pound back and more.

Over the years I have considered gastric bypass surgery but could never make myself do it. I think I am afraid of what could happen. I know what being heavy is and I know what it feels like to be healthy and a good weight. The article I am posting today is about a woman who has had bypass surgery and how it has affected her life. It certainly gave me something to think about. Have a blessed day. Shirley

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By Shannon Britton What They Don’t Tell you

At 27 years old, I weighed 486 pounds and decided to have gastric bypass surgery. I know what you might be thinking: “Oh, you took the easy way out.”

Let me tell you, having weight loss surgery is far from easy. It involves a total commitment to a lifestyle change.

Before my surgery nearly three years ago, I met with my surgeon, nutritionists, exercise coaches and a psychologist. I went to classes and learned about meals, exercise and how my body would change. We learned about plastic surgery — how many weight loss patients have their skin tucked because they have all this excess skin hanging from your body in weird places.

Man lost more than 200 pounds in 3 years 12-year-old gets gastric bypass surgery Wife loses 100 lbs., stuns Army hubby

I was prepared, or so I thought.
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On November 23, 2011, the day before Thanksgiving, I went under the knife. Since then, I’ve lost 268 pounds.

But the thing they do not prepare you for is how you change emotionally after losing a large amount of weight. At first, I thought I would just have this newfound confidence. I’d be thinner and want to run around naked. OK, maybe not naked, but I had this fantasy in my head that one day I would wake up with a body that I loved and would feel comfortable putting into a bikini — that I’d have no body shame whatsoever.

People would accept me more because I wasn’t seen as obese and unhealthy. Dating would get easier. Clothes would fit better. I wouldn’t be judgmental toward other extremely obese people because I was once huge.

Boy, was I wrong.

First off, even though I feel amazing and I am starting to like the way I look, there are days in which I hate my body. I hate how certain clothes push against my excess skin, making it bulge out (think muffin top, but worse). I hate the way the skin hangs down on my arms, and thighs, back and stomach. I hate that it will take at least $15,000 (if not more) in plastic surgery to rid these last 30 to 40 pounds off of my body.

I also have stretch marks and surgery scars across my abdomen and stomach, so being intimate with my boyfriend can be intimidating at times. I knew what I was getting into when I signed up for this, but that knowledge doesn’t erase the self-consciousness I feel when I get out of the shower, or when a stranger or child snickers because they don’t understand why my body looks the way it does.

My relationships also changed. When I first had my surgery, the guy I was with had been a best friend of seven years. He found me attractive at 486 pounds, though I’m not sure why. But once I lost my first 68 pounds, he left.

My surgeon explained that this is common among his bariatric patients. For some reason, it can shake the other partner psychologically when one loses weight, gains confidence and starts getting more attention. But the experience taught me that someone who is jealous of something that makes me better, healthier and stronger never had my best interests at heart.

Dating after that was a struggle, until I met my current boyfriend six months ago. Most guys got scared because they were afraid to take me to dinner, afraid they would break my new diet resolve, and when they saw a picture of what I used to look like, they started to wonder what would happen if I gained a few pounds again.

What else has surprised me about losing weight? No one ever told me that it would upset me when severely obese people get special attention because they choose to be heavy — like when TV shows feature people who are happy to weigh 600 pounds, or people who post YouTube videos professing love of their excess weight.

What They Don’t Tell you

Don’t get me wrong, I think it is great that people are comfortable in their own skin, because many times I’m not always comfortable in my own skin. But for me, being heavy wasn’t a choice. So I guess I have a hard time identifying with them.

Obesity is debilitating to your health. I used gastric bypass surgery as a tool to save my life so that I wouldn’t develop diabetes, have a heart attack at age 35, have a stroke, and to hopefully lower my risk of cancer. Now I have no tolerance for excuses about not being able to eat healthy and exercise.

See, here’s the bottom line: The biggest thing that no one ever tells you about losing weight is that eventually, the number on the scale no longer matters.

What matters is how you feel, how you look and how happy you are. I know at my current weight I am still medically obese, but I have a clean bill of health. Through my bad days and my good days, I am happier now than I have ever been. When I struggle or feel myself about to slip into old habits, I pull out a picture of what I used to look like.

And I remind myself that nothing tastes as good as being healthy feels.

Preserving Avocodos

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When I was a child in California I grew to love avocado and I still do. I was an adult before I found out you couldn’t just pick one off the tree and go to eating as if it were an orange. Avocados are one of those fruits you have to put in a cool dark place for a couple of days and let them become blighted (soft). Then the trick is not to forget they are there or you have a papersack full of mush that you can’t eat.

I found this article on preserving the fruit and decided I wanted to share it with everyone. I hope you find this helpful. Have a blessed day. Shirley

How to Preserve Avocados in the Freezer
BY DIANA JOHNSON

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Food preservation can be one of the biggest money savers that can be utilized. This post will teach you some tips and tricks that can be used for different vegetables, but mainly avocados. If these tips are utilized you will be able to extend the life and freshness by a wide margin. This is a great practice to use if you find yourself having food go bad constantly or always looking for your next guacamole snack. Details at the link below.
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I cannot get enough avocado. In high school, we had an avocado tree in our front yard, and I got avocado whenever I wanted it. In Washington, avocados are freaking expensive! Although various varieties of avocado are available year round, they are typically most affordable in the spring through the fall. When I see a really good deal on avocados (under $1 each for the large size), I buy about ten at a time. But I can’t actually eat that many before they start to go bad, so I have to preserve them. Here’s the technique my mom came up with in Hawaii.My dog Rusty loved avocados. They’d fall from the tree and he’d carefully cradle them in his mouth as if he was holding a little green puppy, carrying them around the yard to gently lay in a pile on our front step. It was so much fun to come outside and find the treasure trove of avocados with little delicate golden retriever tooth marks in them. He was definitely good at retrieving and knew exactly what we would value the most.

Every time we collected his bounty, we’d toss a sacrificial avocado to him as thanks for his good work. He’d roll it around for a little while, joyfully playing with his treat, then curl up around it and begin to nibble it open to get at the sweet buttery flesh.

Not wanting the overripe fallen avocados to go to waste, my mom began preserving them in the freezer. She’d mash them up with lemon juice and store them in airtight plastic bags. Then we had mashed avocado ready to eat whenever we wanted it. We used it for guacamole, mixed it into tuna and chicken salad, spread it on sandwiches.

I have two gallon bags in the freezer right now and could use your help. How do you like to eat mashed avocados?

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Preserving Avocado in the Freezer

Ingredients

5 ripe avocados
5 TBS lemon juice
Cooking Directions

Slice the avocados in half and discard pits. Scoop the flesh from the peels.
Mash the avocados, then add the lemon juice. Mix well.
Spoon into a gallon sized zip top bag, squeezing out all the air before sealing.
Freeze up to one year.

1. Can you use lime juice instead of lemon juice? I’d think so but haven’t tried it. We had a lemon tree as well so that’s what we used.

2. Can you freeze it in ice cube trays to have smaller portions? It’s not only the lemon juice that helps with discoloration, it’s also sealing it in the plastic bag which helps keep it from being exposed to air. I’d suggest that if you want to try the ice cube trays, cover them with plastic wrap and press the plastic down on each “cube” of avocado before freezing. You could also try using sandwich or snack sized bags instead of the quart bags I use.

3. How do you defrost it and what happens? I will typically do a small enough amount in the quart sized bag that it freezes into a one inch thick sheet. Then I can easily break or cut off the amount I want (to spread on a sandwich for instance) and it will defrost quickly on the counter. If I want the whole bag defrosted, I’ll move it to the fridge to defrost overnight. It will be pretty much the same consistency that it was before freezing, but you’ll want to use it within 24 hours because it will start to oxidize and change color and flavor after that.

The True Cost of Owning a Pet

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2Sophie 6 weeks

Hello all. Todays blog was brought to you by Sophie, who spent the night at the emeregency hospital after receiving a bite through the trachea from her big brother, Andy. It was a scary time. Our animals are basically are kids since ours have grown up and left. That’s a whole nother story, so I’ll let that go.

The vet exam and the night at the hospital under observation was $500.00. I have insurance for my others, but not on Sophie yet, so it was directly out of our pocket.

In comparison to human medical care and animal care, I think they run neck and neck. One is just as expensive as the other.

How much is that doggy (or kitty, or birdie) in the window really? The total price tag is probably a lot more than you think.

By: Amanda Lilly

One look at those puppy-dog eyes and wagging tail and it’s easy for all your money smarts to fly out the window. Nonetheless, it is important to consider your lifestyle and budget before bringing home Fluffy or Fido. While there are many foreseeable expenses, such as food and toys, other costs may come as a shock. Need a dog walker, for instance? That can cost as much as $5,200 annually. Pet boarding can extract hundreds of dollars from your bank account, especially if you travel several times a year.

Maybe your budget can easily accommodate regular pet-care expenses, but are you prepared for the higher costs of emergency care? It’s a question that some pet-adoption groups pose to would-be owners: How much money are you prepared to spend on Fido in an emergency? $1,000? $5,000? $10,000? What about for your hamster or parakeet?

Over the years, the Longs had budgeted for emergency pet care, and they have pet insurance, so the financial hit wasn’t as bad as it could have been. The Longs are getting back more than $4,500 of their expenses from Bailey’s insurance. “Bailey is our family,” Long says, “so we just told the vet, ‘Do what you need to do.’ It didn’t occur to me until this was all over that some owners might have had to consider euthanasia as an option if they weren’t as prepared for all the bills.

”Robert Long, managing editor for Kiplinger.com, and his wife have spent more than $13,000 on their 7-year-old beagle, Bailey, this year alone. A sudden and extreme case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in May led to irreversible blindness and the surgical removal of Bailey’s eyes. Two months later, a ruptured disc in Bailey’s back required emergency surgery to resolve temporary rear-limb paralysis. “You don’t want to think about the worst-case scenario,” Long says, “but you should.”

As veterinary procedures become more advanced, people are less likely to put their pet to sleep when it gets severely sick or injured. Owners will likely incur at least one $2,000 – $4,000 bill for emergency care at some point during their pet’s lifetime, says Dr. Louise Murray, vice-president of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital, in New York City.

The prospect of such high costs weighs heavily on many pet owners. Almost half said they were extremely or somewhat worried that they would not be able to afford veterinary care if their pet got sick, according to a 2010 survey by the Associated Press and Petside.com. “The biggest problem I see are people who assume that everything will be fine until their pet is 18 years old,” said Murray. “That’s just incredibly rare. You want to have a plan.”

Preventive care is also important in corralling costs. Having a pet is “kind of like owning a car,” Murray says. “If you don’t do what you’re supposed to do, it will end up being a lot more expensive in the end.” That means getting your pet spayed or neutered, going to the vet for annual check-ups, keeping your pet’s vaccinations and preventive medicines up to date, feeding you pet the proper food, and keeping your pet confined indoors or in a yard and out of harm’s way.

Although the cost of routine care is more predictable, it varies widely from animal to animal, and even from breed to breed — and also from owner to owner. For instance, fish and reptiles can drain your wallet by increasing the cost of your electric bill. Larger breeds of dogs will eat a lot more food than, say, a Chihuahua, and long-haired pets will need to go to the groomer more often. If you have allergies, you may need to get a hypoallergenic pet, which usually costs more both initially and in the long run. If you are away from home a lot, you may need to consider doggy day care or a dog walker, two services that add significantly to your total cost of ownership.

TASTES LIKE CHICKEN

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bigstock-Rattlesnake-8162788Today I’m going to tell you a story about my dad. It came to my mind when someone a couple of days ago blogged about thier mother not cooking wild meat.

My mother and father lived about four miles north of highway 270 west of McAlester, Oklahoma on land where my great grandparents lived. There is a quarter mile drive off the main road to their house. When mama was a little girl her and her grandfather planted a pine tree at the corner of the main road and the drive. That pine tree remains alive and well to this day.

Back in the 1980’s my dad worked at the Navy Ammunition Plant at Haywood as a truck driver and forklift operator. He drove on and off the mountain at least five days a week. Mom would pack a lunch for him every day, which he would put in the refrigerator at the work office.

Everyday someone would get into the lunches in the refrigerator and eat things out of people’s lunch sacks. They thought they knew who the fellow was, but they couldn’t prove it. Everyone was frustrated with this guy.

Tastes Like ChickenOne evening when dad was coming home, he got to the pine tree and thought there was a big limb in the road. He opened the truck door and that big limb coiled. Having a pistol under the seat he proceeded to shoot and kill a seven and a half foot diamond back rattler. He brought it to the house and skinned it out. Mom took the back bone meat and cut it into chunks and fried it. That’s what they ate for dinner that night. My sister said it was good eating and tasted a lot like chicken.

My dad decided he would take some to work the next day for his lunch. He never told a soul about killing the snake or what he had for lunch. He put it in the refrigerator as he always did and went out to the docks to unload a truck.  Noon rolled around and all the guys were sitting at the table eating.  Daddy’s lunch had been gotten into and about half of the meat had been eaten.

Dad began talking and telling the guys about the big rattlesnake he had killed the night before  and how mom had cooked it up for him. He even brought some for his lunch.  Dad said the man accross from him, who happened to be the man who they thought was getting into the lunches, choked on his food. His color turned pasty white and then he turned green and had to leave the room.  They could hear him retching outside and all knew he was throwing his toenails up.

Everyone had a great laugh and guess what else. No one’s lunch was ever robbed again. The man got cured.

Daddy had that snake skin mounted and it hung over their television set for over twenty years. He would still laugh when he told that story about his big snake.

My Grandgoats

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OK, I admit it I’m not the goat’s grandmother, but I am the mother of the owner of this small group of Mini Nubians.  My daughter has gotten into the goat breeding business with both feet along with my son-in-law and grandson. They are breeding the stock to gain a  milk producing, polled (hornless) variety. They have one level to go before they can register the breed.

My daughter is also having visions of riches from selling the hand lotion and body cream she makes from the milk. It’s fabulous stuff. There is something in that goats milk that nourishes the skin. (I’m sorry I got side tracked.)

She is also selling the bottle fed babies to keep her herd at a small size.  She has one more female (Vee) to deliver shortly. In fact it should be sometime in the next week.  She and my grandson always get excited when a new baby arrives. It’s always the cutest of any she has had before. I have to say she loves her goats.

Below is an overview of Mini-Nubian Goats followed by pictures of the herd.

 

Mini-Nubian Goats

 

The miniature Nubian Dairy Goat is the result of a cross between a Nigerian Dwarf buck and a Nubian doe.   The goats maintain the looks, high percentage butterfat content, and  mild flavored milk of the Nubian in combination with the smaller size of the Nigerian.

In height, the Miniature Nubian falls between the standard Nubian and the Nigerian Dwarf. Mini-Nubian Goat does normally stand from 22-25 inches at the withers and weigh under 100 pounds.   Bucks can be larger with a height up to 27 inches and weigh under 135 pounds.

As one of its most distinctive features, the Miniature Nubian maintains the long drooping ears of the Nubian. They also possess the Nubian’s docile temperament, sweet disposition, and wonderful milk characteristics. Miniature Nubian Goats have an average milk production of 1525 pounds in 305 days; that is about 5 pounds or 2 quarts of milk daily. Although small, they aredairy goats with production capacity and teats long enough to get your hands on.

The Miniature Nubian is an experimental breed registered through the International Dairy Goat Registry (IDGR) and the Miniature Dairy Goat Association (MDGA).   A nicely conformed Miniature Nubian should have a long body, a wide escutcheon for good udder attachment, a wide rib cage for carrying kids, a straight top line, a slightlyroman looking nose and long pendulous ears

Miniature Nubians come in a wide range of colors and  patterns. They are friendly, hardy, medium size utilitarians that provide a lot of very healthy milk for their size and unparalleled brush and weed control.  Kids grow quickly and although they are not used for meat much, extra buck kids still make good meat. The Miniature Nubian Goat provides a little something for everyone and is ideal for landowners who are attempting to produce their own food on just a few acres.

 

goat3This is Oreo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

             This is Izzy kissing Mike

goats      Peppers is the white one and Taps is the black billy. Vee is standing on the building. They do love to climb (including cars).

Goat5         This is Carmel.

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Demon Biting Mike. He’s such a cute little thing (not).

Goat7       This is Vee, she is the one that will deliver her kid in the next week or so.

 

 

Arsenic In Our Food

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Grains and cereal-Arsenic-Opener

Consumer Reports  investigation has found troubling levels of arsenic in many of the 200 rice products we tested, everything from brown rice to infant cereal – even some popular name-brand cereals.

Since the arsenic we found in these products could lead to increased cancer risks, it’s time health officials hear your concerns – and get serious about dealing with arsenic in our food!

The FDA must set limits on arsenic in our food and drink, much like EPA does for our drinking water.

And contributors to arsenic contamination, such as pesticides, animal drugs and fertilizers, should be completely banned. Industry can do its part too, by growing rice that absorbs less arsenic, and using rice with the lowest arsenic levels in children’s products.

Organic rice baby cereal, rice breakfast cereals, brown rice, white rice—new tests by Consumer Reports have found that those and other types of rice products on grocery shelves contain arsenic, many at worrisome levels.

Arsenic not only is a potent human

Better Than Sex Cake and a Guest

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OK, let me start out by saying this is my second attempt at posting for today. I’m not sure what happened to the first one but I think it’s floating around in cyberspace somewhere in a few hundred pieces. I’m not one that gives up easily so I’m doing it again.

Today I feel like a cook and I want to share one of my favorite dessert recipes with you. It is mouth-watering good and easy to put together. I gave this recipe to a friend of mine in California and she now makes it every Easter for her family.

Just to let you know, I did not name this cake. You will have to make your own judgements about the title. The ingredients you will need are: 1 yellow pudding cake mix, 1 large box of french vanilla pudding mix, a large can of pineapple, 1 cup of sugar and whipping cream.

Bake the cake according to package directions. I bake mine in a mall aluminum turkey roaster for the high sides. Punch holes over the top of it and let it cool. While the cake is cooling place the sugar and pineapple in a saucepan and heat until all of the sugar has melted and you have a thin syrup. Pour this over the top of your cake. Let it cool. I put mine in the freezer to chill it down quickly. The trick is not to forget it. Mix up your pudding and spread it over the cooled cake. At this point you can sprinkle anything you want on top of the pudding. I use coconut and pecans but it’s entirely up to you what you use. Mix up a bowl of whip cream and put it on top of the pudding. You can sprinkle what you want on top. That’s all there is to it and you have a super moist melt in your mouth cake. Be sure any left overs are refrigerated.

Changing subjects completely, I want to remind you to enter the 100 word flash fiction contest. You can find the instructions in the previous post. I am also posting for Mark Lee, from the Masqueradecrew blog spot, Click HEREHe is wanting to tell you about a contest the crew is doing.

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We’re hosting a short story writing competition. The prompt is being emailed to early responders right now, and it will become public on our website March 15th.

But we need more than just submissions, although we’ll take as many as would like to enter. There’s lots of other things people can do to help us out, however. For instance, we need judges or readers. We’ll also need people to help us edit the winning entries.

Last but not least, as is being done here, we need people to spread the word, tweeting on Twitter about it or hosting a guest post from us. Whatever you would like to do. We would like to get the word out now, but also during the competition. In exchange, we’ll promote you and/or accept guest posts from you.

Interested in helping, let Mark know.
http://masqueradecrew.blogspot.com/2012/02/interested-in-sponsoring-judging-or.html

I wish you well until the next time.
Shirley

Good Intentions, bad results

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A bottle of peanut oil.

Image via Wikipedia

How many of us has done something you thought would be so nice and work out wonderfully.  Today, I am posting a short story about a woman with good intentions.    You never know what will happen in this life.  Every action as a reaction.  I hope you enjoy the story.

Good intentions Bad Results

The Road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Friday, April 16, 2010 is a red-letter day.  I have a new job, I live in my own condominium, my health is good, and my family loves me.  I have so many blessings I cannot list them all.

I have a boyfriend, Andy Wilson.  He is such a loving person.  He makes me happy. I keep a smile on my face when I am with him.  I am falling in love, and I never want it to end.  He’s a man who has everything. He is wonderful, happy, smart, rich, educated; handsome beyond words, and is still single.

The doorbell is ringing. I slowly cross the floor and open the door.  “Come in, Andy”.

“Wow, you look wonderful”.  He grabs me, pulls me towards him, and kisses me.

“Dinner will be in about ten minutes, relax for a few minutes.”

“Dinner is served, sir.  We have a standing rib roast, mashed potatoes, Sautéed asparagus’, honey sweetened baby carrots and yeast rolls.  I made fresh strawberry short-cake for dessert.”

“This is wonderful and I don’t want it to end.  Would you care to dance?” Andy asks.  We dance as my mind keeps telling me; this is too good to be true.

“Paula, I don’t feel well.  My throat feels a little tight.”

“Sit down on the couch. Would you like a glass of water”?  His face was beginning to swell, especially around his mouth.

“Andy, I need to call an ambulance for you.  You are beginning to scare me”.  I called 911, gave them the address and went to Andy.

His respirations are fast, and he is starting to squeak when he exhaled. “What is happening to you”, I asked.  He couldn’t answer me.   My mind is screaming, where are they, it is taking too long.  I can hear the sirens. “They are almost here, Andy.  Hold on honey, please hold on.”

I follow the ambulance to the hospital.  It seems I waited forever, and then the door opens and a nurse in scrubs comes to me, and asks if I am the person with Andy Wilson.

Yes, I’m his girlfriend”.

She took my hand, ”I’m so sorry, but we couldn’t save him.”  My world went cold and black.

Andy died from anaphylactic shock.  It turns out he was highly allergic to peanuts.  I kept running our dinner repeatedly through my mind.  Where could he have gotten peanuts with our dinner?

I went to the pantry to get down my oatmeal.  My eyes scanned the shelves; I notice two bottles of oil sitting next to each other.  One was a light corn oil and the other was, the other was, oh my god, it’s peanut oil.  Now I know, I killed my Andy with good intentions.