Tag Archives: Grandparent

My Grandgoats

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OK, I admit it I’m not the goat’s grandmother, but I am the mother of the owner of this small group of Mini Nubians.  My daughter has gotten into the goat breeding business with both feet along with my son-in-law and grandson. They are breeding the stock to gain a  milk producing, polled (hornless) variety. They have one level to go before they can register the breed.

My daughter is also having visions of riches from selling the hand lotion and body cream she makes from the milk. It’s fabulous stuff. There is something in that goats milk that nourishes the skin. (I’m sorry I got side tracked.)

She is also selling the bottle fed babies to keep her herd at a small size.  She has one more female (Vee) to deliver shortly. In fact it should be sometime in the next week.  She and my grandson always get excited when a new baby arrives. It’s always the cutest of any she has had before. I have to say she loves her goats.

Below is an overview of Mini-Nubian Goats followed by pictures of the herd.

 

Mini-Nubian Goats

 

The miniature Nubian Dairy Goat is the result of a cross between a Nigerian Dwarf buck and a Nubian doe.   The goats maintain the looks, high percentage butterfat content, and  mild flavored milk of the Nubian in combination with the smaller size of the Nigerian.

In height, the Miniature Nubian falls between the standard Nubian and the Nigerian Dwarf. Mini-Nubian Goat does normally stand from 22-25 inches at the withers and weigh under 100 pounds.   Bucks can be larger with a height up to 27 inches and weigh under 135 pounds.

As one of its most distinctive features, the Miniature Nubian maintains the long drooping ears of the Nubian. They also possess the Nubian’s docile temperament, sweet disposition, and wonderful milk characteristics. Miniature Nubian Goats have an average milk production of 1525 pounds in 305 days; that is about 5 pounds or 2 quarts of milk daily. Although small, they aredairy goats with production capacity and teats long enough to get your hands on.

The Miniature Nubian is an experimental breed registered through the International Dairy Goat Registry (IDGR) and the Miniature Dairy Goat Association (MDGA).   A nicely conformed Miniature Nubian should have a long body, a wide escutcheon for good udder attachment, a wide rib cage for carrying kids, a straight top line, a slightlyroman looking nose and long pendulous ears

Miniature Nubians come in a wide range of colors and  patterns. They are friendly, hardy, medium size utilitarians that provide a lot of very healthy milk for their size and unparalleled brush and weed control.  Kids grow quickly and although they are not used for meat much, extra buck kids still make good meat. The Miniature Nubian Goat provides a little something for everyone and is ideal for landowners who are attempting to produce their own food on just a few acres.

 

goat3This is Oreo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

             This is Izzy kissing Mike

goats      Peppers is the white one and Taps is the black billy. Vee is standing on the building. They do love to climb (including cars).

Goat5         This is Carmel.

goats6

 

 

 

 

Demon Biting Mike. He’s such a cute little thing (not).

Goat7       This is Vee, she is the one that will deliver her kid in the next week or so.

 

 

Tastes Like Chicken

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Today is the day I’m going to start my blog again. I’m buried alive by moving boxes but I’m not going to let my blog go any longer. Today I’m going to tell you a story about my dad. It came to my mind when someone a couple of days ago blogged about thier mother not cooking wild meat.

My mother and father lived about four miles north of highway 270 west of McAlester, Oklahoma on land where my great grandparents lived. There is a quarter mile drive off the main road to their house. When mama was a little girl her and her grandfather planted a pine tree at the corner of the main road and the drive. That pine tree remains alive and well to this day.

Back in the 1980’s my dad worked at the Navy Ammunition Plant at Haywood as a truck driver and forklift operator. He drove on and off the mountain at least five days a week. Mom would pack a lunch for him every day, which he would put in the refrigerator at the work office.

Everyday someone would get into the lunches in the refrigerator and eat things out of people’s lunch sacks. They thought they knew who the fellow was, but they couldn’t prove it. Everyone was frustrated with this guy.

One evening when dad was coming home, he got to the pine tree and thought there was a big limb in the road. He opened the truck door and that big limb coiled. Having a pistol under the seat he proceeded to shoot and kill a seven and a half foot diamond back rattler. He brought it to the house and skinned it out. Mom took the back bone meat and cut it into chunks and fried it. That’s what they ate for dinner that night. My sister said it was good eating and tasted a lot like chicken.

My dad decided he would take some to work the next day for his lunch. He never told a soul about killing the snake or what he had for lunch. He put it in the refrigerator as he always did and went out to the docks to unload a truck.  Noon rolled around and all the guys were sitting at the table eating.  Daddy’s lunch had been gotten into and about half of the meat had been eaten.

Dad began talking and telling the guys about the big rattlesnake he had killed the night before  and how mom had cooked it up for him. He even brought some for his lunch.  Dad said the man accross from him, who happened to be the man who they thought was getting into the lunches, choked on his food. His color turned pasty white and then he turned green and had to leave the room.  They could hear him retching outside and all knew he was throwing his toenails up.

Everyone had a great laugh and guess what else. No one’s lunch was ever robbed again. The man got cured.

Daddy had that snake skin mounted and it hung over their television set for over twenty years. He would still laugh when he told that story about his big snake.

It’s Here, Again

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I remember asking my mom how long would it be before I got out of high-school and how long would it be until I finished  school and many more “how long until questions”.  She would tell me, and then tell me not to be in such a big hurry.  My mind was saying, “sure mom”, the entire time she’d be talking.  That was like telling the wind not to blow.  “You will see when you  get older just how fast time will  go by.”  You know she was right.

One year barely gets going before another one is here.  My babies have babies, who have babies.  I know that can’t be possible, because I’m not old enough to be a great-grandmother.  I think I’m 49, but maybe I’m 62.  Those years which keep running over each other getting here, have really messed up my mind.   Maybe that’s a good thing and I won’t realize that my world has changed.

Time marching on is a double-edged sword.  I have watched my family grow and prosper, as well as myself, but I have also watched some of my family leave this world.  They are in a better place, but I’m selfish and want them here with me.  I have watched  familiar things disappear around me.  I hate it that they are rebuilding all the bridges around my childhood home.  I will miss those one lane bridges with the wood runners going over.   The bridges will be a lot safer for those coming up, but people(especially new drivers) won’t feel the thrill I did when I drove across, praying I  wouldn’t fall off into the creek if I ran off those boards.  They say change is good and I suppose it is.  I now know how my grandparents and parents must have felt as their world changed around them.

That is my New Year ramblings.  I’m going to eat my black-eyed peas and thank God for the wonderful life I have. I have no control over time or changes, so I guess I’ll just do what I do every year and go with the flow.  With love from my family and friends and lots of help from God, I will survive.

I wish each  of you a Happy, Prosperous, Healthy New Year.  Turn up your speakers and listen to this one man choir sing Old Lang Syne as we start this new year and leave 2011 behind us.

http://youtu.be/0VaxyutCQAk

 

Heaven Is For Real

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This is day #4 and I just heard the most interesting interview from a four-year old boy who had emergency surgery and while on the operating table, went to heaven, met his miscarried sister, great-grandfather and came back to his body.  I read the reviews that were written after the interview and it really took me by surprise.  You had people saying there is no heaven yet because Jesus has not come back to earth, the little boy just lied, he is satanic, because only the saved can go to heaven.

The father and son wrote a book called Heaven Is Real.  They both were talking very sincerely.  The boy looks to be about seven now.  He talked of Jesus, having a rough face and blue eyes.  He said God could hold the world in his hands.  I found the whole conversation intriguing.  The book is on Amazon.com along with many other books about leaving the body, going to heaven and then returning.

I for one am a believer of the out-of-body experience.  I also believe God can use anyone to spread his message, including a four-year old boy.  I will be reading the book and doing a review here on my blog at a later time, but right now I would like to know how many believe in an out of body experience and why.    I have added the video.  Let me know what you think.  That is my two cents for today.