Tag Archives: Protagonist

Character Development Part 11

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The main character of comic Oswald.

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How do you get your characters?  Do you think about them for a long period of time and have them fully fleshed out in your mind before you start writing, or do you let them develope themselves.

I believe I blogged in an earlier blog, my characters in “The Tower” took on a life of their own and just were there.  I would come up with a name, and my main character developed as my story went along, plus several others.  I don’t think there is a right or wrong way, unless you tend to have very flat one dimensional characters.

My characters for “The Tower,” was not based on anyone I knew.  When my sister read the book she knew my main character was her.  I just let her go on thinking down that line.  Maybe she was, but it was on a unconsious level from me.

When it comes to your characters development there are questions you can ask yourself that will help the development.  Below is a list of possible questions.

1.  What is your character’s name?  Is there a nick name?

2.  What is the character’s hair and eye color?

3.  Any distinct physical features?  Scar, long eye lashes, birthmark, tatoo, ect.

4.  Who are your characters family and friends?  Who is the character closest to?

5.  Where and when was your character born?

6.  What type of personality does your character have?

7.  What is your characters desires and fears?

8.  Does your character have a secret?

9.  Where does your character live?  What type of abode? House, apartment, tent, ect.

10.  What does your character do when he/she is angry?

The questions can go on and on and with each answer you develop your character.  You man not use all of the information, but you have it, if needed.

If you are writing a story about good versus bad, then you would need to develop two characters, the protagonist(good) and the antagonist(bad).  You want to develop round characters and this can be accomplished with a little bit of thought and time for your characters.

Enjoy the video:  Joyce Carol Oates – On Writing Characters

http://youtu.be/LgJ809QKmas

 

Who Is That Character?

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A conversation in Eternal Fantasy depicting th...
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I’ve been told you must know your characters.  Your main characters desires should be known.  If you want your character to gather the sympathy from your readers then give the character a strong desire.  What is being strived for, a new job, romance, riches, knowledge.  If your character doesn’t have a need, do you think your readers will find excitement in your book. How do you say “boring?”

You have to make your character multidimensional, and not leave him flat.  What creates the most vivid picture, 3D or regular television?   It is a matter of contrast in your characters.  As humans we are very complicated and you have to show that complication in your characters also. That way your reader can really get interested in your character.

You may also be tempted to make your character all good or all bad.  Both sides should be shown in your character.  “Dan thought his head would blow off he’s neck at any time.  His night out at the bar  has messed him up one more time.  He has to get up, and get to the church, because he is teaching Sunday School today.”  This sentence showed a man who appears to have a problem with alcohol (bad side), and he teaches Sunday School (good side.)  It shows at least two side of Dan.

Your contrasts should be worked into your story, so they do not become road blocks for the reader.  You want your story to keep moving forward.  You can have your character step out from the usual character portrayed as long as the tendency has been shown before.  That way it is not a stopping point.

Gotham’s  “Writing Fiction” states,” your characters should have the ability to change and the reader should know it.  Change is particularly important for a story’s main character.  Just as the desire of a main character drives the story, the character’s change is often the story’s culmination.”

This doesn’t mean your main character has to change but the reader should always know change is possible.  Predictability is created if you do not give the character the potential to change.

I have covered a few ways to help you create a character that your reader can get to know.  The video today on creating characters.     That is my two-cents for today.

http://youtu.be/8VoZNlvSpdE PS this video gives lots of  good information but there is cafe noise in the background.