Tag Archives: Rome

Football Can Be Harmfull

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This is a repost from DNews on Football and one of my blogs on just how unhealthy football is. The season has started again and I cringe. I’m married to a college football fanatic plus anything else that has to do with a ball of any kind.

I hate football just because of the damage that it does to it’s players and now it seems to the audience also. Why do we humans participate in things that cause others pain for our enjoyment? Remember Rome and the Gladiators. Even after 100’s or thousands of years nothing hasn’t changed. I can visualize the cave man playing dodge ball with rocks and people cheering as the rock bounced off his head. I don’t see the attraction at all.

I’m sure there will be people who can’t understand my side either. They think I just don’t know how great the game is. My son and my husband can talk on the phone for an hour about who’s playing and where they playing,along with spouting numbers who has done this or that. I don’t get the attraction.

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Football has an intellectual attraction that keeps fans interested, according to Almond.

The game requires understanding a vast, complex series of rules (that are amended each year), and players can move in many different and unexpected directions (unlike baseball, for example). There are big swings in momentum, and it’s satisfying to watch.

“What’s happening in football for a fan is that you are combining this primal aggressive buzz (with) this unbelievably strategically dense game. Baseball players are static. Football is carefully controlled chaos.”

Despite the pull football exerted on Almond, a lifelong Oakland Raiders fan, he decided that he couldn’t watch it anymore because of its seamier side: its violence, misogyny and the corrupting influence of big money.

“It’s complicated,” Almond said. “But for me, the darkness was enough to realize that I didn’t want to be a sponsor anymore.”

The skull and crossbones, a common symbol for ...

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According to an article I read today in “The Week“, a losing football team can kill you.  The University of California did a study of the death rate following the Rams Superbowl trips in 1980 and 1984.  The record review revealed some very scary numbers.  After the team lost their bid for the Superbowl, heart attacks deaths went up fifteen percent in men, twenty-seven percent in women, and twenty-two percent in senior citizens.  Four years later when the Rams won the Superbowl the numbers didn’t change at all.

This study shows how much emotion is put into your favorite football team.  The lead researcher felt people reacted due to making the team “a family member.”  A die-hard becomes very emotional, causing stress.  This stress increases the pulse rate, raises blood pressure and can trigger a cardiac event.  Is ranting and raving because your team lost the game worth the possibility of having a heart attack and possibly dying?

Take a look at this video and you can see what it is feels like to experience a heart attack.  This video was made in England and says to call 999, but here we call 911.  Please pay attention, it could save your life.  That’s my two-cents for today.

http://youtu.be/LUt1xXASm_s

Tatoo’s Through The Ages

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I have always had an interest in Archaeology and I’m especially fond of Old world Egypt.  In one of my magazines I found an article that really caught my attention. It was about Tattoos and about how far in our past they go back.

Tattoo's Across the AgesTattoo's Across the Ages

I have to admit I am not a big fan of Tattoos because I know over time they grow to look rather dull instead of the vibrant piece of art work they started out to be.  I also believe that some overdue the tattoos on their bodies, and that is a personal preference. It really is “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.”

People have been tattooing themselves for about 7000 years now. What makes a person decide to have a mark or picture put permenatly on their skin. Is it that constat drive to be different, to be set apart. It might also be a status symbol among some.

Tattoo's Across the AgesTattoo's Across the Ages

Otzi a copper age mummy found in Europe is probably the most famous tattooed man.  He died high in the Italian Alps more than 5,000 years ago.  Otzi’s body was almost perfectly preserved by snow and ice which covered him after his death.  Otzi had tattoo’s in the form of lines and crosses over his well worn ankles, wrists, knees , lower back and Achilles tendon.  When these lines were cut into the skin, charcoal was then rubbed into them.  Reasearcers now believe that they were theraputic in nature.  Was this the first form of accupuncture?

So thoughout the ages men and woman have dad tatoo’s for numerous different reasons. If you have one, what was your reasoning?

In the Greco-Roman world tattoo’s were a mark of shame and punishment. They tattooed crimianls, and slaves who tried to escape. When a country was invaded the victors would tattoo the inhabitants with their mark. Rome also tatooed slaves to show that taxes had been paid.  Bottom line is people have always come up with a reason why they needed tattoo’s.Tattoo's Across the Ages

My daughter received a tattoo across her lower back. She couldn’t explain to me why she did it other than she wanted it. Captain Cook was the first to use the verb “tattoo”.  It has even been around for a long time.  In 1769 he wrote in his diary about the Tahitian art of tatau. I guess that I will have to accept the fact the tattoo is not going to dissapear from this world’s society.